Living Is Hard West African Music In Britain 1927-1929

Honest Jon's
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  • 1. Oni Johnson – Garse Yer Fido
  • 2. Isaac Johnson – Nitsi Koko Ko Ko
  • 3. Ben Simmons –
  • 4. Harry E. Quashie – Anadwofa
  • 5. Ben Simmons – Mu Kun Sebor Wa Wu
  • 6. Douglas Papafio – Kuntum
  • 7. Prince Zulamkah – Ligiligi
  • 8. The West African Instrumental Qunitet – Adersu - No 2
  • 9. The Ga Quartet – Abowe Dsane Nmaka Tso
  • 10. Domingo Justus – Buje
  • 11. Ben Simmons – Obu Kofi
  • 12. James Tucker – Rue Bai Rue Bai
  • 13. John Mugat – Bukay
  • 14. Kumasi Trio – Asin Asin Part 2
  • 15. Douglas Papafio – Sakyi
  • 16. James Thomas – Jon Jo Ko
  • 17. Nicholas De Heer – Edna Buchaiku
  • 18. George Williams Aingo – Akuko Nu Bonto
  • 19. Nicholas De Heer – Ewuri Beka
  • 20. George Williams Aingo – Agur Bi Dzi Mansu Aba
  • 21. James Brown – Mukorin-Mantun
  • 22. Nicholas De Heer – Wasiu Dowu
  • 23. John Maget – Alahira

The first in a series of recoveries by Honest Jon's from deep inside the EMI Archive — staggering selections from more than 150,000 78s, recorded all over the world during the first half of the twentieth century.

'So it is that Honest Jon's has (again) unearthed an episode of black music history in Britain: these are tough cuts — in no way easy listening, but absolutely essential' (**** The Observer).

'While the likes of Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charley Patton were making the earliest blues recordings in America, this equally strange and compelling music by West African singers and musicians was simultaneously being recorded in London... [a] treasure trove of golden voices, chants, authentic percussion and traditional instruments presented in totally unmediated fashion' (***** Songlines).

Highly recommended!