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    Theon Cross / PokusCandace of Meroe / Pokus OneSoul Jazz Records

    This is a one-time only pressing of this 12" single and will be deleted on release. Two killer tracks that are not on the vinyl version of the Kaleidoscope album. Theon Cross's superb Candace of Meroe and Pokus' equally striking Pokus One

    • Theon Cross – Candace of Meroe
    • Pokus – Pokus One
    • Limited-edition one-off 12" single£12.99
      In stockAdd to Bag
    Black RiotSoul Jazz Records

    VINYL FACTORY COMPILATION OF THE YEAR 2020!!!

    See chart here

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    LIMITED EDITION COMES WITH FREE GRAPHIC STORY!

    Soul Jazz Records’ new Black Riot: Early Jungle, Rave and Hardcore is a brand new collection of heavyweight ragga-influenced hardcore jungle tracks from the early 1990s. Dark and heavy!

    Featuring classic and seminal tracks from the likes of Levictus and Krome &Time, alongside a host of rare and little-known ragga & junglist hardcore tunes from the likes of Babylon Timewarp’s hypnotic Durban Poison, Rhythm for Reasons’ mad ‘The Smokers Rhythm’, The Freaky rave-y breakbeat sound of ‘Time and Age,’ Trip One’s super dark ‘Snowball’ and loads more!

    Expect super heavy basslines, equally heavy twisted Amen drum loops, even heavier ragga vocals! Original jungle style - roots and culture - from the earliest days of drum and bass.

    Included with the album is a free limited-edition graphic mini-novel “Black Riot: The Mysterons save Planet Earth from the Xatheroid Angels.” This is the third collaboration between Soul Jazz Records and writer/illustrator Paulo Parisi, the highly respected author of graphic books on Jean Michel Basquiat and John Coltrane.

    This new graphic story continues the story of black electronic dance music – this time set around the birth of Jungle and continues onwards from Soul Jazz’s earlier ‘Invasion of the Killer Mysterons’ (Jamaican electronic Dub, co-compiled by Kevin Martin (The Bug)) and Mysterons Invade the Jackin’ Zone (about Chicago Acid & Experimental House).


    • Rhythm For Reasons – The Smokers Rhythm
    • Babylon Timewarp – Durban Poison
    • The Terrorist – RK1
    • DJ Dubplate – Tings A Go On
    • Leviticus – Burial (Lovers Rock Mix)
    • The Freaky – Time and Age
    • Trip One – Snowball Remix
    • DJ Krome & Mr. Time – Ganja Man
    • New Vision – Way Of Life
    • DJ Dubplate – Original Rubadubstyle
    • Hi Fi Power – Chill Out (Raggafunks U)
    • Nu Jacks featuring Ivory Ranks – House Sensation
    • New 2×LP + Download Code + Limited Edition Graphic story£24.00
      In stockAdd to Bag
    • CD plus Limited Edition Graphic story£12.00
      In stockAdd to Bag
    • MP3 Release£7.99
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    The Wailing SoulsTrouble Maker / Run My PeopleSoul Jazz Records

    Seminal, uplifting, righteous, soulful roots anthem!

    • The Wailing Souls – Trouble Maker
    • The Wailing Souls – Run My People
    Jackie MittooOboe / Wall StreetSoul Jazz Records

    BACK IN STOCK!!

    MONSTER STUDIO ONE TUNE FIRST TIME EVER ON A SINGLE !

    Two highly sought after tracks from Jackie Mitoo's legendary 'Showcase' album, originally released on Studio One in 1980

    Hypnotic, blissed out funky reggae from Jamaica's finest - Bagga Walker on bass, Leroy 'Horsemouth' Wallace on drums, Ernest Ranglin on guitar and, of course, the inimitable Jackie Mittoo on keyvoards

    Cut super loud on a 12" single, its literally impossible to find a copy of this album, and if you did it would set you back hundreds of £'s

    Housed in a heavyweight card Studio One sleeve these won't be around for long ! Very Limited edition 1000 copies worldwide 12” pressing

    • Jackie Mittoo – Oboe
    • Jackie Mittoo – Wall Street
    Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation Of RastafariTales Of MozambiqueSoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation’s seminal 1975 album Tales of Mozambique in an expanded double album/single CD/digital format, fully remastered and with the inclusion of two bonus rare single-only tracks, full sleevenotes, exclusive photographs and interview.

    Count Ossie is the central character in the development of Rastafarian roots music, nowadays an almost mythical and iconic figure. His importance in bringing Rastafarian music to a populist audience is matched only by Bob Marley’s promotion of the faith internationally in the 1970s.

    Count Ossie’s drummers performed on the first commercially released single to integrate Rastafarian traditional music with popular music: the vocal group The Folkes Brothers’ groundbreaking song ‘Oh Carolina’, recorded for producer Prince Buster in 1959. In 1966 his drummers greeted the momentous arrival of Haile Selassie at Kingston airport.

    His legendary jam sessions up in his Rastafarian compound in the hills of Wareika, Kingston, are famous for the many Jamaican musicians who attended including The Skatalites players – Roland Alphonso, Don Drummond, Johnny Moore, Lloyd Knibbs – and many others.

    The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari formed in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1970, a union of Count Ossie’s Rastafarian drummers – variously known as his African Drums, Wareikas or his Afro-Combo – and the saxophonist Cedric Im Brooks’ horns group, The Mystics.

    The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari are the defining group in bringing authentic Rastafarian rhythms into the collective consciousness of popular music, their unique music is at once rooted in the deep traditions and rituals of traditional drumming and chanting alongside a forward-thinking, even avant-garde, artistry influenced by the likes of John Coltrane, Sun Ra, Pharoah Sanders and other pioneering African-American jazz artists radicalised and charged by the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

    Tales of Mozambique is a truly unique and fascinating ground-breaking album.

    Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari are the central group featured on Soul Jazz Records recent "Rastafari - The Dreads Enter Babylon” a collection showing the influence of Rastafari in Reggae and Jamaican popular culture.

    Soul Jazz Records will also be releasing Count Ossie and The Rasta Family 'Man From Higher Heights’ in the near future.

    * Bonus tracks

    REVIEWS

    " All roads in Rastafarian roots music lead to Count Ossie.He’s the lead character in this compelling subplot, the musician who was one of the first to put Rasta tenets into the heart of popular music.

    He did so from his camp in the hills above Kingston, Count Ossie and his drummers casting a spell on the musicians who gathered to check him out and then went on to spread the word about the powerful nyabinghi rhythms and mesmerising percussion.

    This is a reissue of the 1975 album Count Ossie made with his Rastafarian drummers and saxaphonist Cedric ‘Im’ Brooks’s group The Mystics.

    It’s a groundbreaking, majestic work, by turns righteous in tone and joyous in execution. It’s the sound of Ossie and his ensemble narrating a history lesson and you’d be daft not to want to find out more."  IRISH TIMES

    • – Sam's Intro
    • – Tales Of Mozambique
    • – Selam Nna Wadada (Peace & Love)
    • – No Night In Zion
    • – I Am A Warrior
    • – Wicked Babylon
    • – Let Freedom Reign
    • – Lock, Stock And Barrel
    • – Nigerian Reggae
    • – Run One Mile
    • – Rasta Reggae*
    • – Samia*
    Trees SpeakOhmsSoul Jazz Records

    Super-limited new 1000 copies special white vinyl edition!

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    When the band Trees Speak, coming out of nowhere, released an exclusive one-off 100-pressing white label 45, described as CAN/NEU! meets LIQUID LIQUID, it sold out so quickly (in less than 30 mins - one for sale on Discogs now at £400!) that Soul Jazz Records decided to release their album almost immediately.

    Here it is! And it's awesome!

    Soul Jazz Records rarely release new music but found the music of TREES SPEAK’s album ‘OHMS’ so stunning and to have so many elements of music that they admired that they felt compelled to release it.

    The group Trees Speak are from Tucson, Arizona and create new music that sounds like GERMAN KRAUTROCK meets NO WAVE/POST-PUNK and PSYCH ROCK – music for fans of CLUSTER, TANGERINE DREAM, CAN, NEU!, SILVER APPLES and early KRAFTWERK.

    The album ‘OHMS’ sounds at times like a tripped out & moody JOHN CARPENTER/GOBLIN/MORRICONE soundtrack that seamlessly segues into propulsive, ‘motorik’ Krautrock instrumentals loaded with fuzzy, hypnotic mellotron, synths and analogue effects, as well as elements of ART ENSEMBLE free jazz, and all at times reaching a kind of post-rave psychedelia. More recent comparisons would include BEAK and GHOST BOX who draw upon similar themes and styles.

    Trees Speak are Daniel Martin Diaz and Damian Diaz plus musicians from the Tucson, Arizona scene such as Giant Sand, XIXA and James Hunter. ‘Trees Speak’ relates to the idea of future technologies storing information and data in Trees and plants - using them as hard drives – and the idea that Trees communicate collectively.

    Trees Speak - Ohms :

    Album of the Month - Splintered Eye/50 Best albums 2020 - Pop Matters/Favourite albums 2020 -The Soap Company/Albums of the Year 2020 -Bear Tree Records/Independent Albums of the Year -Love Records/Albums of the Year -Concrete Islands

    • Trees Speak – Soul Sequencer
    • Trees Speak – Nitrous Cross
    • Trees Speak – Shadow Circuit
    • Trees Speak – Blame Shifter
    • Trees Speak – Spirit Duplicator
    • Trees Speak – Nobody Knows
    • Trees Speak – Sadness In Wires
    • Trees Speak – State Of Clear
    • Trees Speak – Sleep Crime
    • Trees Speak – Knowing
    • Trees Speak – Splendid Sun
    • Trees Speak – Ohms
    • Trees Speak – Out Of View
    • Trees Speak – Psychic Wounds
    • Trees Speak – Silicone Emotions
    • Trees Speak – Octave Cycle
    • Trees Speak – Witch Wound
    Alhaji Chief Kollington Ayinla & His Fuji '78 OrganizationBlessing (Nigeria, 1978)Soul Jazz Records

    This is the first in Soul Jazz Records’ new series of one-off pressings of limited-edition 1000 copies vinyl-only releases of Afro-funk/Afro-beat exact-replica, super-rare albums that were previously only ever released in Nigeria.

    The series starts with Kollington Ayinla’s celebrated 1978 album ‘Blessing,’ a rare lost classic of Nigerian Fuji music, featuring Ayinla’s sharp political lyrics together with his new band Fuji ’78. ‘Blessing’ blends the heavily percussive style of Fuji music with a stunning array of modern instruments, including synthesizers, Bata drums and guitars, to create one of the most forward-thinking and heavily danceable sounds ever to come out of Nigeria – a highly successful mixture of profound Fuji rhythms and Fela Kuti-style Afrobeat.

    Kollington Ayinla ranks alongside his friend and competitor Ayinde Barrister as the two most important artists to dominate Fuji music from its inception in the 1970s through to the 1990s by which time it had grown to become one of the most popular dance genres in Nigeria.

    At the start of the 1980s Ayinla started his own record company, Kollington Records, to release his music and remains to this day an extremely prolific artist, having recorded over 50 albums, most of which have never been released outside of Nigeria.

    • – E Ye Ika Se
    • – Oromo Adie Fo
    • – Ko S'Ohun Tan O Le Fi Gberaga
    • – Adio Shile
    • – Won Ti Gbe Oye Fun Mi
    • – Pataki L'Omo
    • – To Ba Jisoro Mi
    • – Engineer Olatunji / Iya Suna
    • – Odun Titun De
    • – Ao Toro Emi Gesa Fun Enia
    • – Ki Aiye Ma Gbagbe Mi
    Soul Jazz Records presents Apala:Apala Groups in Nigeria 1967-70Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records new ‘Apala: Apala Groups in Nigeria 1967-70’ is the first ever collection of Apala music to be released outside of Nigeria.

    The album focusses on a wide selection of recordings made in Nigeria in the 1960s, a time when Apala music was at the height of its popularity. Apala is a deeply rhythmical, hypnotic and powerful musical style that combines the striking nasal-style vocals and traditions of Islamic music, the Agidigbo (thumb piano), and the equally powerful drumming and percussion rhythms and techniques of the Yoruba of Nigeria.

    The most significant figure in Apala music is undoubtedly Haruna Ishola who features throughout this album. Ishola holds an almost mythological status in his role as populariser of Apala music in Nigeria. Ishola’s singing was believed to be so powerful that, without proper restraint, it could kill the recipient of his music.

    Apala is a popular music that also functioned as a form of cultural resistance – Apala music involved no western instrumentation and is sung in the Yoruba language, its aesthetic an implicit cultural rejection of the British Empire’s colonial rule over Nigeria which lasted from 1901 until independence in 1960.

    Apala music was popular and widely accepted in Nigeria due to its philosophical and profound lyrical content alongside the complex rhythmic patterns of this heavily percussive style, which highlighted many of the percussion instruments of south-west Nigeria.

    Apala is one of a number of popular urban styles of music that came out of Nigeria in the 20th century and sits alongside the more well-known (in the West) styles of Fuji, Highlife, Juju and Afrobeat. Of these modern forms Apala remains perhaps the most ‘roots’ style (sometimes described as ‘neo-traditional’) due to the authenticity of its sound. It has similar Islamic roots to other neo-traditional styles of Nigeria – including Waka and Sakara – examples of which are also included on this collection contextualising the music of Apala.

    These recordings were originally made and released locally by Decca and EMI Records as well as a variety of independent labels in Nigeria and have never been released outside of the country before. Soul Jazz Records are releasing this album as a deluxe double gatefold vinyl (+ download code), CD, slipcase and booklet, both containing full text and photography.

    • Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – Ewure Ile Komoyi Ode
    • Adebukonla Ajao and Her Group – Aboyin Ile
    • Rapheal Ajide and His Apala Group – Adura Fun Osiwowo
    • Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – Orin To Mo Gbon Wa
    • R.A. Tikalosoro and His Group – Agilinti Lomu
    • Adebukonla Ajao and Her Group – A.B.D. Alawiye
    • Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – Asa Ko Gbodo Wole Gbeiyele
    • Adeleke Aremu & His Group – Egbe Arowolo
    • Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – Rufai Baolgun
    • R.A. Tikalosoro and His Group – Kiniun Kuro Leran Amu Sere
    • Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – S. Aka
    • Adebukonla Ajao and Her Group – Lekele Bale
    • Kasumu Adio and His Apala Group – Odale Ore
    • Ayisatu Alabi and Her Group – Oko Lolomo
    • Jimoh Agbejo Bo Ogun and His Group – Oriki Ibeji
    • Ayisatu Alabi and Her Group – Omo Olobi
    • Rapheal Ajide and His Apala Group – Orin Aje
    • Adebukonla Ajao and Her Group – Sunday Babayemi
    • 1. Haruna Ishola and His Apala Group – Ewure Ile Komoyi Ode
    • 2. Adebukonla Ajao and Her Group – Aboyin Ile
    • 3. Rapheal Ajide and His Apala Group – Adura Fun Osiwowo
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Johnny Osbourne / Prince JazzboTruth and Rights / CrabwalkingSoul Jazz Records

    It's the bomb! Two massive Studio One cuts back to back.

    • Johnny Osbourne – Truth and Rights
    • Prince Jazzbo – Crabwalking
    Space Funk - Afro Futurist Electro Funk In Space 1976-84Soul Jazz Records

    ‘Space Funk – Afro Futurist Electro Funk in Space 1976-84’, is an intergalactic journey into black space, fuelled by funk, powered by computers.

    ‘Space Funk’ is a lovingly compiled collection of superb, rare and off-the-wall space funk and electro releases mostly released on small independent labels in the late 1970s and 1980s.

    Reactors are reacting, boosters are boosting, pack your funk and shake your booty! Computer funk … makes you jump! This is the space funk program!

    The album comes in deluxe artwork and three formats – digipack + slipcase CD, a very limited deluxe 2xLP + bonus 7” single + download vinyl version, and a standard 2xLP + download standard vinyl version.

    Features music by Jamie Jupitor, Solaris, Robotron 4, Juju & the Space Rangers and many more intergalactic space warriors!

    The shuttle program has been altered – there is no Star Wars only electro funk jam joyriders in Space – hold tight!


    • L E O – Fee Fi Fo Fum
    • The Sonarphonic – Super Breaker
    • Santiago – Bionic Funk
    • Frank Cornilius – Computer Games
    • JUJU & The Space Rangers – Plastic
    • Jamie Jupitor – Computer Power
    • Solaris – Space Invaders
    • Copperfield – Make It Good To Me Baby
    • Robotron 4 – Electro-?
    • Ernest Flippin II – Supersonic Space Lady
    • Funk Machine – Funk Machine
    • Ramsey 2C-3D – Fly Guy and The Unemployed
    • Osé – Computer Funk
    • 7 Below Zero Band – Seven (We Are)
    • Rodney Stepp – Break-Out
    Soul Jazz Records presents Steve ReidRhythmatism (1976)Soul Jazz Records


    Soul Jazz Records are issuing the awesome deep jazz album Rhythmatism (1976) from the legendary Steve Reid long out of print in a new edition very limited 1000-copies COLOURED vinyl (+download code) and CD.

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    ‘Steve Reid is one of the greatest drummers.

    He is a musical genius’ KIERAN HEBDEN (Four Tet)

    ‘A truly phenomenal artist.’ GILLES PETERSON

    ‘Steve Reid reflects the spirit of a generation- Art Ensemble of Chicago, John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders, the Black Artists Group.’ THE WIRE


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    Drummer and composer extraordinaire Steve Reid’s Rhythmatism is one of his deepest and most radical of albums of all time and features some of the heaviest jazz players - Arthur Blythe ‘AKA Black Arthur’, Charles Tyler, David Wertman and others – joining Reid. The album was originally released on Reid’s own Mustevic Sound label in 1976

    As a radical jazz artist, Steve Reid played with an extraordinary group of artists – including Miles Davis, Sun Ra, Fela Kuti, James Brown, Ornette Coleman, Lester Bowie, Freddie Hubbard, Jackie McLean, Dionne Warwick, Archie Shepp, Chief Bey, Olatunji, Arthur Blythe, , Dextor Gordon, Gary Bartz, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Sam Rivers, Leon Thomas, Lonnie Smith and Horace Silver!

    Reid was born in the South Bronx, and grew up in Queens, New York. He played in the house band at Harlem's Apollo Theatre, accompanying James Brown, as well as playing in Sun Ra's Arkestra. He lived next to John Coltrane, worked in a department store with Ornette Coleman, had a son who played drums with NWA. He began his career as a teenager in the 1960s as a drummer at Motown when he played on Martha and The Vandellas "Heatwave" (aged 14).

    At the end of the 1960s Reid was sentenced to four years in jail as a conscientious objector of the Vietnam war. On his release from prison in 1974, he formed the Legendary Master Brotherhood and started the independent record label, Mustevic Sound, to release his debut LP in 1976. Rhythmatism is released in its entirety and with full original cover art here and is one of a series of stunning independent records he released in the 1970s.

    At the start of the 21st century, his career took a new twist when Steve Reid began a successful collaboration with Kieran Hebden (Four Tet). Hebden referred to Reid as his ‘musical soul mate’, resulting in a number of joint albums.

    Steve Reid died in New York in 2010. Subsequently the Steve Reid Foundation was set up in his name, to help aspiring musicians and artists.

    • Steve Reid – Kai
    • Steve Reid – Rocks (for Cannonball)
    • Steve Reid – Center Of The Earth
    • Steve Reid – C You Around
    • Steve Reid – One Minute Please
    Nigeria Soul Power 70 (Expanded Double LP Set)Soul Jazz Records

    Seriously rare, killer and classic Nigerian 70s Afro-Funk, Afro-Disco & Afro-Rock tunes bought together.

    Originally released as a now-long-out-of-print collectors’ 7” RSD box, this fully expanded album release now also includes extra tracks from Sonny Okosuns, Wings, Chief Kollington Ayinla and more.

    Soul Jazz Records’ Nigeria Soul Power 70 album showcases the influence of funk, rock and disco on Nigerian music during the 1970s

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    While for many people the fusion of funk and jazz music with Nigerian rhythms and aesthetics began with Fela Kuti and his afro-beat sound, in fact this can be traced further back to the phenomena of the 1960s Nigerian artists and house bands in nightclubs and hotels who interpreted US soul and pop music with a local flavour and none more so than Geraldo Pino, the ‘African James Brown’ who features heavily in this collection. Other similarly inspired Nigerian funk and soul artists featured here included Tony Grey and his Ozimba Messengers and Don Bruce and The Angels.

    Nigeria Soul Power 70 includes a number of tracks from the group Wings originally known as BAF (Biafran Air Force) Wings, an army band formed during the Biafran civil war in Nigeria. The groups’ heavy mixture of funk, rock and African styles was popular among many Nigerian groups at the time.

    Beneath the shadow of the few Nigerian artists who signed international recording deals in the 1970s – Fela Kuti, King Sunny Ade, Chief Ebenezer Obey – lies a vast wealth of largely undiscovered musical transmutation and cultural cross-pollination, and included here are heavy afro-funk/rock and disco tracks from artists such as the legendary Sonny Okosuns as well as rare cuts from little-known outside of Nigeria - groups such as Colomach and MFB. Most of these obscure artists signed to major labels in Nigeria in the commercial slipstream that opened up as Philips, Decca and EMI tried to emulate the international success of the big three international Nigerian artists.

    Finally featured here is Kollington Ayinla, one of the co-founders of Nigerian Fuji music, who gives us perhaps the heaviest of all tracks on this album. Ayinla is the great moderniser of the Fuji sound and in the late 1970s began adding Bata drums and synthesizers to his authentic music to create a powerful and heavy new fusion of traditional and modernist aesthetics, embracing both new technology and experimentation while rooted firmly in Nigerian historical lineage.

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    Nigeria Soul Power 70 is released as a heavyweight gatefold double vinyl LP (+ free download code), deluxe slipcase CD and digital album.

    • Geraldo Pino – Shake Hands
    • Sonny Okosuns Ozziddi – Dance Of The Elephants
    • The Wings – We'll Get Home
    • Alhaji (Chief) Prof. Kollington Ayinla – E Ye Ika Se
    • Colomach – Kassa Kpa Sama Kpa
    • Geraldo Pino – Heavy Heavy Heavy
    • MFB – Beware
    • Tony Grey and The Ozimba Messengers – You Are The One
    • Sonny Okosuns Ozziddi – Oba Erediauwa I
    • The Wings – Single Boy
    • Geraldo Pino – Power To The People
    • Original Wings – Igba Alusi
    • Don Bruce and The Angels – Sugar Baby
    • Geraldo Pino – Africans Must Unite
    Willie WilliamsArmagideon Time (Discomix Vocal / Version)Soul Jazz Records

    MASSIVE STUDIO ONE ANTHEM ALERT!!!

    Willie Williams' roots rock reggae classic Armagideon Time – the rare 12" extended Discomix version split into two sublime heavyweight slices and cut super-loud on a 12" single.

    Produced by Studio One supremo Coxsone Dodd this is a huge Reggae anthem on the classic 'Real Rock' rhythm, famously covered by The Clash and sampled by KRS One, The Fugees and many more.

    A dancefloor devastating Reggae party bomb!

    • Willie Williams – Armagideon Time (Discomix Vocal)
    • Willie Williams – Armagideon Time (Discomix Version)
    Lloyd McNeillElegiaSoul Jazz Records

    Super rare deep spiritual jazz album with a heavy Brazilian influence featuring Nana Vasconceles, Dom Salvador, Portinho, Cecil McBee and more. Originally released privately by the artist and flautist Lloyd McNeill in 1980 and out of print for nearly 40 years.

    Soul Jazz Records' newly remastered edition of ‘Elegia’ is released as a limited-edition 1000-copies worldwide on Vinyl (+ download) and 1000-copies worldwide CD edition.
    Lloyd McNeill is a cultural polymath – a multi- disciplinarian flautist, painter, academic, poet, and photographer – who has worked with everyone from Mulatu Astatke to Nina Simone, Eric Dolphy and Nana Vasconcelos (and as a painter was befriended by Picasso!). McNeill grew up during the era of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and his life and work is a reflection of those ideals. All of his music was only ever released on his own private-press record label, echoing the Civil Rights and African-American themes of the era - black economic empowerment and self- sufficiency – and there is a beautiful spirituality in all his music.

    This is the fifth Lloyd McNeill album that Soul Jazz Records have made newly available and follows on from the earlier McNeill albums ‘Asha’ (1969), ‘Tanner Suite’ (1969), ‘Washington Suite’ (1970) and 'Treasures’ (1976) all now reissued by Soul Jazz Records.

    • Lloyd McNeill – Samba For The Animals
    • Lloyd McNeill – Behind The Wind
    • Lloyd McNeill – Asha II
    • Lloyd McNeill – Elegiac Suite For Elizabeth
    • Lloyd McNeill – Striped Pants
    • Lloyd McNeill – Memory Cycle
    Studio One DJ PartySoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records’ new Studio One DJ Party is the latest instalment from the mighty Studio One Records catalogue, a wicked new collection of the finest DJs and toasters ever to inhabit the world of reggae – seminal Jamaican artists including Prince Jazzbo, Dillinger, Dennis Alcapone, Michigan & Smiley, Lone Ranger as well as a host of lesser known artists and rare cuts from Studio One.

    From the earliest days when Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd ran his Downbeat soundsystem up and down the length of Jamaica, DJs and toasters such as King Stitt and Count Machukie were always a part of the sound of Studio One, introducing new records and exciting audiences with catchphrase lines such as:

    “No matter what the people say these sounds lead the way

    It's the order of the day from your boss deejay” King Stitt

    So when DJ emerged as a distinct reggae style at the start of the 1970s, Studio One was, as always, way ahead of their competitors. Legendary artists of the calibre of Dillinger, Dennis Alcapone and Prince Jazzbo all queued up to record for the equally legendary label.

    At the end of the 1970s, as dancehall exploded onto the island, Clement Dodd was once again able to maintain Studio One’s position on the throne as the number one sound in the Jamaica, fighting off upstart competitors such as Channel One and Joe Gibbs who tried to replicate Studio One’s unique sound. During this period Clement Dodd released a series of stunning dancehall releases from young DJ/dancehall artists at the label including Lone Ranger and Michigan & Smiley.

    This selection spans the early 70s up until the mid-1980s, from the earliest days of deejay toasting right up until digital dancehall, ground-breaking tracks over the finest selection of the ultimate Studio One rhythms and tracks. Who could ask for more?

    Studio One DJ Party includes specially commissioned sleevenotes by Chris Lane, founder of the legendary British reggae label Fashion Records, as well as fantastic original artwork commissioned by the illustrator Ski Williams. The album is released as double heavyweight vinyl (+download code), and distinctive Soul Jazz Records CD with slipcase.

    • Screechie Dan – We A Don
    • Lone Ranger – My Number
    • Dennis Alcapone – Riddle I This
    • Kentrus – It A Fi Bun
    • Lone Ranger – Apprentice Dentist
    • King Sporty – DJ Special
    • Prince Jazzbo – Little Joe
    • Ragga Muffin – Ragga Muffin
    • Mad Roy – Universal Love
    • King Sporty – Choice Of Music
    • King Stitt – Rhyming Time
    • Prince Jazzbo – Fire Coal Version
    • Dillinger – Fountain on The Mountain
    • Michigan & Smiley – Thank You Jah
    • Prince Garthie – Raindrops
    • Jah Buzz – Automatic Clapping
    • Dennis Alcapone – El Paso
    • Big Joe – Nanny Version Skank
    Airto de MoreiraSamba De Flora (1980)Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are re-releasing Airto Moreira’s classic album ‘Samba de Flora’, out of print for 30 years ever since its original release in 1988. The album is very limited to just 1000 copies only, pressed on both vinyl and CD.

    The impact of Airto Moreira in both the world of American jazz and in Brazilian music is unparalleled. At the start of the 1970s Airto was invited to join Miles Davis’ groundbreaking ‘electric’ group, which with albums such as the seminal ‘Bitches Brew’ helping Davis regain his title from John Coltrane as the most important jazz artist of all time.

    Two years later Airto helped establish two of the most important jazz fusion groups of all time: Weather Report, with Wayne Shorter, Joe Zawinul and Miroslav Vituous; and Return to Forever, with Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and Flora Purim.

    Airto Moreira also began his solo career in the USA in 1970, and alongside his wife, the singer Flora Purim, and Brazilian artists such as Hermeto Pascoal, Sivuca, Deodato, Raul de Souza, Azymuth, all played a major part in the Latinised sound of American jazz fusion throughout the 1970s.

    By this time Airto established himself in the USA in the 1970s, he had already had a formidable career back in Brazil in the 1960s as an important figure in the Bossa Nova movement, which soon after spread throughout the world. Airto played in a number of important groups during this time – Quarteto Novo Sambalanco Trio and Sambrassa Trio (all of with Hermeto Pascoal) – which proved to be three of the most ground-breaking groups of this era.

    The album ‘Samba de Flora’, including the seminal jazz dance title track, is a masterpiece of jazz and Brazilian fusion and features Airto Moreira alongside Flora Purim, fellow Brazilian artist Raul de Souza and heavyweight USA jazz musicians Alphonso Johnson, percussionist Don Alias (from Stone Alliance), Cuban conga player Cachete and Argentinian pianist Jorge Dalto.

    The album was originally released on the small independent Montuno Record label (which was run out of the unassuming Record Mart record store situated in the Times Square underground subway station!) and has been unavailable for many, many years.

    This album is fully re-mastered and re-released by Soul Jazz Records for the first time ever, packaged in full original artwork on both vinyl (+ download code) and CD.

    • Airto – Parana
    • Airto – Samba De Flora
    • Airto – La Puerta
    • Airto – Dedos
    • Airto – Yanah Amina
    • Airto – El Fiasco
    • Airto – Mulambo
    • Airto – Latin Woman
    Brazil USA 70: Brazilian Music In The USA In The 1970sFeaturing Airto, Deodato, Sergio Mendes, Flora Purim, Sivuca, Donato & moreSoul Jazz Records


    All of the music featured here on this new Soul Jazz Records collection was created by Brazilian artists living and working in the USA in the 1970s.

    The album brings together some of these finest works and comes complete with extensive notes that explains the path these musicians took from Brazil to the USA and shows the political and musical links between Brazil and the USA that created the conditions for this unique fusion of these two distinct cultures, North American Jazz and Brazilian music, that occurred in the 1970s.

    In the early 1970s North American jazz musicians were eager to work with upcoming Brazilian musicians. Miles Davis invited Airto Moreira to join his new ‘electric’ band, Dom Um Romao (part of Sérgio Mendes’ legendary Brazil ‘66 in the 1960s) joined the fusion group Weather Report, Flora Purim and Airto both became a part of Chick Corea’s new project Light As A Feather, Wayne Shorter collaborated with Milton Nascimento, George Duke recorded Brazilian Love Affair, and so on.

    With all the attention placed on them from these important jazz artists, North America became the new musical playground for a large number of these Brazilian artists – Airto Moreira, Flora Purim, Sérgio Mendes, Luiz Bonfá, Eumir Deodato, João Donato and many others.

    Most of these musicians had already experienced success through the earlier popularity of bossa nova in the 1960s, either at home in Brazil or in the USA. But by the end of the 1960s many Brazilian artists had left their own country, as the military dictatorship became progressively more authoritarian and repressive. In the USA, through their critically acclaimed work for Miles Davis, Weather Report, Light As A Feather etc., all of these artists were now given reign to explore new musical terrains away from the restrictions of both a musical genre and a state censor back in Brazil.

    The album comes as a deluxe gatefold double vinyl LP, complete with download code, full sleeve notes, exclusive photography, double inner sleeves. The CD contains CD plus a large 40-page outsize booklet all housed in Soul Jazz slipcase.

    • Airto – Samba De Flora
    • Duke Pearson and Flora Purim – Sandalia Dela
    • Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 – Batucada (The Beat)
    • Deodato – Skyscrapers
    • Milton Nascimento – Catavento
    • Airto – Tombo in 7/4
    • Luiz Bonfá – Bahia Soul
    • Dom Um Romao – Braun-Blek-Blu
    • Moacir Santos – Kathy
    • João Donato – Almas Irmãs
    • Sivuca – Ain't No Sunshine
    • Milton Nascimento – Rio Vermelho
    • Tamba 4 – Consolation (Consolação)
    • Flora Purim – Moon Dreams
    • Dom Um Romao – Escravos de Jo
    • Airto – Andei (I Walked)
    • 1. Airto – Samba De Flora
    • 2. Duke Pearson and Flora Purim – Sandalia Dela
    • 3. Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 – Batucada (The Beat)
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Lloyd McNeillTreasures (1980)Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing flautist Lloyd McNeill’s album ‘Treasures’ (1980). Originally released on the artists’ own private press Baobab label in New York, the album is a serious collectors’ piece, a heavyweight and fascinating fusion of deep spiritual jazz with Brazilian and rhythms and melodies. The album has been out of print for nearly 40 years. This is a very limited edition pressing of 1000 vinyl + 1000 CDs only.

    This groundbreaking album is the culmination of Lloyd McNeill’s many years involved with Brazilian musicians and features the great percussionist Nana Vasconcelos alongside fellow Brazilian’s Portinho and Dom Salvador alongside US jazz musicians including bassist Cecil McBee.

    In a 50-year musical career, McNeill has worked with many artists including Nina Simone, Eric Dolphy, Mulatu Asatke and Sabu Martinez.

    McNeill grew up during the era of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and his life and work is a reflection of those ideals. All of his music was only ever released on his own private-press record label, echoing the Civil Rights and African-American themes of the era - black economic empowerment and self-sufficiency – and there is a beautiful spirituality in all his music.

    In the late 1960s McNeill became teacher of both jazz and painting at the New Thing Art and Architecture Center in Washington and in 1969 was the first African-American professor hired to teach African-American Music History, at Rutgers University.

    This is the fourth Lloyd McNeill album that Soul Jazz Records have released and follows on from the recent release of ‘Treasures’ (1976) and the earlier albums ‘Asha’ (1969), ‘Tanner Suite’ (1969) and ‘Washington Suite’ (1970) all of which are being re-pressed to coincide with this new release.

    This album is fully re-mastered from original source and is re-released for the first time ever on Soul Jazz Records in a very limited edition of 1000 vinyl (+ download code), 1000 limited edition CD pressing and digital.

    • Lloyd McNeill – Griot
    • Lloyd McNeill – As A Matter Of Fact
    • Lloyd McNeill – Salvation Army
    • Lloyd McNeill – You Don't Know What Love Is
    Soul Jazz Records Presents Fashion Records : Style & FashionA-Class Top Notch Hi Fi Sounds In Fine StyleSoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are proud to present this new collection of music from the great Fashion Records, one of the most important and iconic independent labels to come out of the UK, and which ran from 1980 for nearly 20 years.

    In that time Fashion released hundreds of records that successfully reflected, and indeed set, the changing styles and perspectives of reggae music in the UK – from UK dancehall and lovers rock in the 1980s through to the mighty rise of jungle in the second half of the 1990s.

    While nearly all other UK reggae labels focused on releasing Jamaican music – from the early days of Island and Trojan in the 1960s, through Island and Virgin in the 1970s, and Greensleeves that came up in the 1980s – Fashion’s focus was firmly on music produced in the UK. This unique British perspective shaped both lyrical content and musical fashion. And like all the great music labels – from Studio One to Blue Note – Fashion was able to create a significant roster of its own artists.

    Amazingly for a small independent label, a number of Fashion artists achieved mainstream UK chart and crossover success – including Laurel & Hardy, Smiley Culture and General Levy. But although this success was welcomed, crossing over into the mainstream was never the main focus for the label owners Chris Lane and John McGillivray (who also runs the successful Dub Vendor record shop) whose starting point was always primarily focused on producing quality music first.

    In the early 1980s, Fashion Records captured the rise of the emerging British dancehall scene in its ascendency. The large roster of first generation British-born artists and MCs on the label – including General Levy, Papa Face, Smiley Culture, Bionic Rhona, Asher Senator, Laurel & Hardy, Top Cat and many more – often gave a unique and sometimes humorous British lyrical perspective to Fashion releases, discussing everyday subjects, from police harassment to road safety!

    Throughout much of the 1980s and into the 1990s Fashion continued to release an almost relentless array of UK dancehall releases as well as continuing with lovers rock, and the occasional dub releases. Then, in the mid-90s, with the dancehall and reggae releases still coming on strong, Fashion released a superb series of early jungle tracks linking Jamaican and British MCs and dancehall artists with young jungle mixers, re-mixers and producers. By this time dancehall artists General Levy and Cutty Ranks had become the staple vocal samples of literally hundreds of white label jungle records and Fashion took advantage of this, often getting young producers to work in exchange for sample clearances – don’t get mad, get even!

    This album is a subjective and scatter-gun ride through some of the many unique and heavyweight tracks to come out of the Fashion stable that we love – some classics, some lesser-known, all 100% killer!

    The album is released on heavyweight triple vinyl (+ download code), deluxe double CD with outsize booklet and slipcase, and digitally. The album comes with extensive sleevenotes featuring interviews with Fashion founders Chris Lane and John MacGillvary, as well as exclusive photography and original artwork and flyers.



    • Papa Face featuring Red Man – Dance Pon De Corner
    • Dee Sharp – Let's Dub It Up
    • Cutty Ranks – Limb By Limb (DJ SS Remix)
    • General Levy – Mad Them
    • Laurel & Hardy – You're Nicked
    • Bunny General – Played By This Ya Sound
    • General Levy & Hard 'n' Pure – Wikkeda!!
    • Carlton Lewis – Small Talking
    • Poison Chang – Shot Fe Bust (Marvellous Cain Remix)
    • Dee Sharp – Rising To The Top
    • Papa Face With Keith Douglas – DJ Jamboree
    • General Levy – Heat
    • Carlton Lewis – Sweet Soul Rocking
    • Top Cat – Ruffest Gun Ark (DJ Rap Mix)
    • Papa San – DJ Business
    • Papa Face & Bionic Rhona – To The Bump
    • Cutty Ranks – As You See It
    • Janice Walker – You'll Never Need Somebody
    • Asher Senator – Bubble With I
    • 1. Papa Face featuring Red Man – Dance Pon De Corner
    • 2. Dee Sharp – Let's Dub It Up
    • 3. Cutty Ranks – Limb By Limb (DJ SS Remix)
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Soul Jazz Records Presents Bunny Lee: Dreads Enter The Gates With PraiseThe Mighty Striker Shoots The Hits!Soul Jazz Records

    ‘Bunny Lee, the Hit Maker from Jamaica.’

    Soul Jazz Records presents this collection featuring the heavy 70s roots reggae of Bunny Lee – a living legend, one of the last of the great Jamaican record producers who helped shape and define reggae music in the 1970s from a small island sound into an internationally successful musical genre.

    From teenage fan to young record plugger for Duke Reid, Sir Coxsone and other early pioneering Jamaican musical entrepreneurs, Lee has spent his whole professional life inside the Kingston music industry. In the 1970s he rose up to become one of the major record producers in Jamaica alongside Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, and the other ‘small axe’ producers, who broke the dominance of the ‘big tree’ producers that had ruled Jamaican music in the 1960s.


    Featuring some of the heaviest Jamaican artists including Johnny Clarke, King Tubby, Dillinger, Prince Jazzbo, Tommy McCook, The legendary Aggrovators (featuring Sly and Robbie), The Mighty Diamonds and more, the album is a rollercoaster ride of rare, deep and classic 1970s roots, dub and DJ sounds.


    During this era ‘flying cymbals’, crashing reverbs, dark echoing thunderclap gunshots and other ‘implements of sound’ filled his record productions as Bunny Lee explored the outer limits of dub with his friend King Tubby in the mix on wild versions that accompanied any 45. A Bunny Lee record provides a creative and mysterious hidden guide to reggae music itself, a double-sided three-minute intangible history lesson etched in wax.

    Bunny Lee was one of the first Jamaican producers to travel to England in the late 1960s, at the beginning of the nascent British reggae music industry as record companies such as Trojan, Pama and others began licensing Jamaican music in the UK to supply the expanding West Indian communities living up and down England. Lee encouraged other Jamaican producers to do the same, including Lee Perry, Harry J and Niney the Observer, and also became a conduit between the British music industry and numerous younger Island-based producers - a frequent flyer reggae ambassador, a musical courier exchanging tapes for royalties.


    His first recordings in the late 1960s were mainly rock steady but as the 70s approached the music soon began to mutate and slow down into ‘reggae’ as the sound became heavier, more roots-y and the sound itself began to change with the explosion of dub. Lee was at the forefront to this dramatic musical shift into roots reggae, and by this time had become a major producer, capable of working with whoever he chose as world-famous singers, DJs and musicians lined up to work with the charismatic man. Lee also employed a fluid but stable set of crack session musicians who he named The Aggrovators.

    Most of the recordings featured here come from the mid-70s, a time when Bunny Lee was definitely ‘in the zone,’ releasing heavyweight singles at an almost unstoppable rate. Bunny Lee’s career stretches over five decades and he has upwards of 2,000 production credits on vinyl.

    Did you work all night?

    ‘Yeah man, night and day. One weekend I remember, I go in a Channel One on a Friday night and I never come out ‘til Monday morning. Just send out to get food and ting.’ Bunny Lee

    This album comes with extensive sleevenotes, an interview with Bunny Lee, and exclusive photography. The album is available as a massive triple LP vinyl + download code, house inner, full notes, as well as deluxe CD pack with 24-page booklet, and digital album.

    • Johnny Clarke – Enter Into His Gates With Praise
    • King Tubby Meets Tommy McCook and The Aggrovators – The Dub Station
    • Gene Rondo – Why You Do That
    • Vin Gordon & The Aggrovators – Magnum Force
    • Jackie Edwards – So Jah Seh
    • The Aggrovators – So Jah Seh Dub
    • Jah Youth – Principle and Dignity
    • King Tubby Meets Tommy McCook and The Aggrovators – King Tubby Dub
    • Jah Stitch – Real Born African
    • The Aggrovators – African Love Call
    • Gene Rondo – A Land Far Away
    • The Uniques – Queen Majesty
    • Johnny Clarke – Time Will Tell
    • The Aggrovators – Drums Of Africa
    • Dillinger and King Tubby – Jah Jah Dub
    • Winston Wright – Marvelous Rocker
    • The Mighty Diamonds – You Should Be Thankful
    • King Tubby, Prince Jammy and The Aggrovators – A Thankful Version
    • Dillinger – Check Sister Jane
    • Prince Jazzbo – The Wormer
    • The Uniques – You Don't Care For Me
    • Shorty The President – Natty Dread Have Ambition
    • King Tubby and The Aggrovators – This A The Hardest Version
    • 1. Johnny Clarke – Enter Into His Gates With Praise
    • 2. King Tubby Meets Tommy McCook and The Aggrovators – The Dub Station
    • 3. Gene Rondo – Why You Do That
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Soul Jazz Records presents Eddie RussFresh Out (1974)Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are re-releasing keyboardist Eddie Russ’s seminal debut deep jazz LP Fresh Out (and the first album ever released on Soul Jazz Records!) in a new limited edition COLOURED vinyl 1000 copies worldwide (+ free download code) and new CD edition.

    Eddie Russ's Fresh Out was independently released in Detroit in 1974 and has remained a collector's item ever since. Russ was an important figure to emerge from the vibrant underground jazz scene that thrived in Detroit in the early 1970s, existing in the cultural and economic desolation of the city after the departure of Motown in the late 1960s.

    This scene included the musical collective Tribe (including members Wendell Harrison, Marcus Belgrave, Phil Ranelin, Harold McKinney and Doug Hammond) and Kenny Cox’s Strata Records. Eddie Russ’s Fresh Out was first released in 1974 on the independent Jazz Masters record label.

    As well as including the classic jazz dance cut The Lope Song, Eddie Russ’s Fresh Out featured the debut of the group The Mixed Bag who subsequently recorded for both Tribe and Strata Records. Eddie Russ released two further classic jazz funk albums in the late 1970s, See the Light and Take a Look at Yourself.

    • Eddie Russ – The Lope Song
    • Eddie Russ – All But Blind
    • Eddie Russ – Shamading
    • Eddie Russ – Hill Where The Lord Hides
    • Eddie Russ – You Are The Sunshine Of My Life
    • Eddie Russ – Watergate Blues
    Studio One Black Man's Pride 3 : None Shall Escape The Judgement Of The AlmightySoul Jazz Records

    This is the latest new installment of Soul Jazz Records’ on-going collection of Rastafarian music at Studio One, featuring classic material from legendary roots and culture artists The Gladiators, Horace Andy, Freddie McGregor, Sugar Minott and the Wailing Souls, alongside a superb selection of rarities from Sir Coxsone’s musical empire made up of one-off and practically unknown Rastafarian artists who recorded on a myriad of Studio One off-shoot labels in the 1970s – The Manchesters, Mellodies, The Nightingales and others.

    In this new collection, we see that once again the prescient Clement Dodd was a man who saw the wider picture. In the 1960s it was Sir Coxsone who identified the creative potential of The Wailers, Toots and the Maytals, Heptones, Burning Spear and many, many others. In the 1970s Studio One released an untouchable selection of the finest as styles moved from reggae to deejay to dub and, in the latter half, the emergence of dancehall.

    But what is also clear is that throughout this era Studio One released an incredible amount of roots music, and not just the most commercially obvious. For alongside the career-building catalogues of Burning Spear, The Wailing Souls, The Gladiators and so on, one needs to be an ardent Studio One collector to know some of the truly raw Rastafarian music featured here. Groups such as The Manchesters or The Nightingales feel as if they were recorded straight out of the churchical chants of the mansions.

    Black Man’s Pride explains the links between the ideology of Clement Dodd at Studio One and the Rastafarian faith, which was the creation of Afro-Jamaicans and concerned above all else with a black consciousness and empowerment, a rediscovering of the personal and racial identity of black people. The movement began in the 1930s and, in tandem with this black consciousness, called for a rejection of the British imperial culture that dominated Jamaica, while creating an identity based on a re-appropriation of an African heritage.

    The Rastafari movement was like a pivot, bringing together and balancing many vectors of ideologies. Marcus Garvey’s Back to Africa movement, trades union discourse, anti-colonialism and nation independence, maroon self-definition and independence, the spirit of African rebellion in the Caribbean. For Clement Dodd, a black man and producer growing up in Kingston in this era, Rastafari was simply a part of his everyday world – from witnessing Count Ossie’s grounations to the faith of many Jamaican artists at Studio One – from the Skatalites onwards.

    Featured here alongside these classic and rare tracks from Studio One are new and extensive sleeve notes with track-by-track notes by Rob Chapman, author of the acclaimed Downbeat Special and Never Grow Old Studio One books.

    The album is released as double heavyweight gatefold vinyl (+ free download code), CD with slipcase and booklet, and digital album.

    • Horace Andy – Conscious Dread Lock
    • The Gladiators – A Prayer To Thee
    • Freddie McGregor – Beat Down Babylon
    • The Manchesters – Selassie Bandman
    • The Mellodies – Dread Oppression
    • Big Joe – Jah Jah Help Us
    • Horace Andy – Oh Lord Why Lord
    • Lloyd Jones & The Super Natural Six – Get Up and Try
    • The Wailing Souls – Can't Catch Me
    • The Nightingales – Jehovah
    • Alphanso Stewart – It's No Secret
    • Errol Dunkley – Satisfaction
    • Mr Manchester – Give Natty Dread Glory
    • Lincoln (Sugar) Minott – Wrong Doers
    • Noel Campbell & The Gladiators Band – Sufferation
    • African Brothers – No Cup No Brock
    • Zoot Simms – When The Time Comes
    • Glen Miller – Whey No Dead
    Soul of a Nation 2Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records’ new release ‘Soul of A Nation: Jazz is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher’ is a powerful new collection of radical jazz, street funk and proto-rap made in the era of Black Power (1969-75).

    This is the second ‘Soul of A Nation’ album released by Soul Jazz Records to coincide with the exhibition ‘Soul of a Nation – Art in the Age of Black Power’, critically acclaimed and enormously successful when it opened at the Tate Modern in London last year (as was Soul Jazz Records’ accompanying first album ‘Soul of A Nation – Afro-Centric Visions in the Age of Black Power 1968-79’). The blockbuster international exhibition is now at the Brooklyn Museum, New York and then travels to Los Angeles in 2019.

    This new album features a number of important and ground-breaking African-American artists – The Art Ensemble of Chicago, Don Cherry, Funkadelic, Gil Scott-Heron and more – alongside a host of lesser-known artists all of whom in the early 1970s were exploring new Afrocentric poly-rhythmical styles of music – radical jazz, street funk and proto-rap – while at the same time exploring the Black Power and civil-rights inspired notions of self-definition, self-respect and self-empowerment in their own lives.

    During this era African-American jazz musicians ripped up traditional definitions – rejecting the term ‘entertainer’ to redefine themselves instead as ‘artists’. They worked outside of the mainstream music industry perceiving this artistic relationship to be fundamentally exploitative and politically flawed. Artists instead formed their own pan-arts community-centric collectives, set up their own record labels, ran concerts in alternative performance spaces – art galleries, parks, lofts, community centres – all as a way of taking control of their own creative destinies.

    At the start of 1960s jazz musicians had embarked on an intense period of musical experimentation as artists John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman and Don Cherry sought to dismantle the traditional definitions of jazz by creating new music that broke free from its establishment shackles. By the end of the 1960s, forward-thinking African-American jazz musicians had absorbed the ideas of this radical and avant-garde path but also began to introduce many new elements – not just civil rights concepts of freedom but also black power ideas of self-respect, righteousness and anger.

    Their music developed into a radical and intense Afrocentric mix of jazz, funk, soul and street poetry, all in search of a new musical language that could better represent artistic African-American cultural expression.

    All of the featured artists here were involved in this search in different ways; A shared sense of Afrocentric collectivism joined the dots between the deep avant-garde experimentalism of The Art Ensemble of Chicago (here featuring soul singer Fontella Bass singing the powerful ‘Theme de Yoyo’) to the hyper funk psychedelia of George Clinton’s Funkadelic.

    The poetry of Gil Scott-Heron and Sarah Webster Fabio performed with a backdrop of street funk and heavyweight percussion laid down the template for the birth of rap. The Har-You Percussion Group, a group of young Harlem teenagers, showed how government-sponsored social initiatives helped create great art and music. Gary Bartz and The Oneness of Juju offer spirituality and cosmology. Collectives like The Pharaohs and Detroit’s Tribe add deep jazz and street funk in equal measures. And so on.

    Influenced and radicalised by Black Power and civil rights, all these artists were involved in creating – in the words of the Art Ensemble of Chicago – ‘Great Black Music: Ancient to Future.’

    This album is available as heavyweight triple vinyl (+free download), full and extensive text, exclusive photography, with house inners, and as deluxe CD with slipcase, 40-page outsize booklet and jewel case.

    • The Art Ensemble Of Chicago – Theme De Yoyo
    • The Har-You Percussion Group – Welcome To The Party
    • The Pharaohs – Damballa
    • Baby Huey – Hard Times
    • James Mason – Sweet Power, Your Embrace
    • Byron Morris and Unity – Kitty Bey
    • Funkadelic – Nappy Dugout
    • Rashied Ali & Frank Lowe – Exchange Part 2 (II)
    • Gary Bartz NTU Troop – Celestial Blues
    • Oneness Of Juju – Space Jungle Funk
    • Sarah Webster Fabio – Work It Out
    • Tribe (Wendell Harrison and Phillip Ranelin) – Beneficent
    • Gil Scott-Heron – Whitey On The Moon
    • Don Cherry – Brown Rice
    • 1. The Art Ensemble Of Chicago – Theme De Yoyo
    • 2. The Har-You Percussion Group – Welcome To The Party
    • 3. The Pharaohs – Damballa
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Brown SugarI'm In Love With A Dreadlocks: Brown Sugar and The Birth Of Lovers Rock 1977 - 80Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing this first ever collection of the pioneering British reggae Lovers Rock group Brown Sugar including rare singles, dubs and extended mixes. The album comes with extensive sleevenotes and interviews with Dennis Bovell, Pauline Catlin, John Kpiaye and Winston Edwards (Studio 16).

    Brown Sugar were formed by three young teenage girls – Pauline Catlin, Caron Wheeler and Carol Simms in South London in 1976. In the short period of time 1976-1980, the group – working with Dennis Bovell on the mixing desk and John Kpiaye (‘Brownie T) in the studio – recorded barely a handful of singles on the new Lovers Rock label, a number of which went to the top of the UK reggae charts. But success stopped there, and with no album release and no industry support the group broke up in the early 1980s.

    Following their split Caron Wheeler became the lead vocalist for the hugely successful group Soul II Soul, Carol Simms launched a solo career as Kofi (re-making a number of Brown Sugar songs with producer Mad Professor) and Pauline Catlin returned to education.

    Despite their relatively low-key mainstream public exposure Brown Sugar (and the label on which their first records appeared) announced to the world a new genre of reggae music, Lovers Rock, which spoke for the first time with the sensibility of a new segment of British society; that of first generation-born Black British female youth.

    And while Lovers Rock became synonymous with sweet love songs, Brown Sugar’s music in fact expressed far more; a righteous pride and consciousness in being Black and British, a political stance more often associated with UK roots groups like Black Slate, Aswad, Misty in Roots and other British reggae acts in the late 1970s. Brown Sugar were in fact their own genre of ‘conscious lovers rock’ – an expression of ideological black cultural pride.

    Brown Sugar’s handful of three-minute love songs (often plus extended dubs) somehow manage to encapsulate all the complexities of identity, sexual politics and youthful righteousness of Afro-Caribbean youth living in Britain in the 1970s. Songs such as ‘I’m in Love with A Dreadlocks’, ‘Our Reggae Music’, ‘Black Pride’ and ‘Dreaming of Zion’ spoke with a straightforward righteousness and consciousness that few roots groups could hope to match. The fact that they were all teenagers is even more striking.

    In the mid-70s British reggae came into being as first generation Black Britain was able to find a voice able to express the issues of growing up British with Caribbean roots. This came about in two different ways – the British roots music of (essentially male) groups such as Aswad, Steel Pulse and Black Slate – and Lovers Rock, the expression of a black essentially (but not totally) female consciousness – Brown Sugar, Louisa Mark, 15-16-17, Marie Pierre, Janet Kay, Carroll Thompson, Jean Adebambo and others. And significantly, while British roots music was a variant on a Jamaican style, Lovers Rock was uniquely British – the first authentic British reggae sound.

    Dennis Bovell comments, “For Lovers Rock we needed a pulpit, a way of saying ‘this is the style’. Sound systems were already saying ‘this is lovers,’ brandishing it in the dance. Our intention was to create a style of music that my generation could identify with – one that had a beat, and you could dance to with your partner in a sound system setting.”

    Dennis Bovell’s mixes for the group gave a further dimension to Brown Sugar records – a sound system mentality, adding sound effects and dub elements. ‘I’m in Love with A Dreadlocks’ was the debut release for both Brown Sugar and the Lovers Rock label, a fitting calling card for both. The record was a hit on many sound systems across the UK, reaching the top of the reggae charts.

    John Kpiaye: “They never put out an album. And all these records were seven-inch singles; when 12-inches turned up it just killed the seven-inch.”

    Although the career of Brown Sugar was short-lived, their legacy and influence remains significant and now, 40 years on from these first records, all of the members are still involved in music. Pauline Catlin has recently re-launched her career under a new moniker, Shezekiel; Carol Simms, aka Kofi, remains a successful solo artist, one of the queens of Lovers Rock; Caron Wheeler, after leaving Soul II Soul at the end of the 1980s, embarked on a solo career, before re-joining the soul super-group which she continues to front to this day.

    This new collection brings together all the groups essential recordings for the first ever time and is released as double gatefold heavyweight vinyl + free download (+ full sleevenotes), CD with large booklet, and digital album.

    • – Black Pride
    • – Our Reggae Music
    • – Hello Stranger
    • – I'm In Love With A Dreadlocks
    • – Hurtin' (with Dennis Bovell)
    • – I'm So Proud
    • – Runaway Love
    • – Dreaming Of Zion
    • – Loving Dreadlocks Dub
    • – You and Your Smiling Face
    • – Do You Really Love Me
    • – Proud
    • – Confession Hurts
    Sugar MinottSugar Minott At Studio OneSoul Jazz Records

    Long-out-of-print re-release of this classic Sugar Minott album on Soul Jazz Records bringing together the best of his classic material recorded at Studio One in the 1970s.

    Lincoln Sugar Minott was born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1956. He grew up in a poor area of West Kingston and from an early age developed a love of Reggae music and the music of Studio One in particular. As a teenager, he became selector for Sound of Silence Keystone and Gathering of Youth local sound-systems. By the late 1970s Minott had risen to become one of the biggest stars in Jamaican music.

    Sugar Minott began his career at Studio One. After auditioning in front of Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd in the early 1970s, he became the first artist to record new songs over classic rhythms, singing over original Studio One tapes – the significance of which led directly to the birth of dancehall, as Channel One, Joe Gibbs and hundreds of other Jamaican producers quickly began releasing their own material based on these same classic Studio One rhythms replayed by Sly and Robbie, The Aggrovators, Soul Syndicate, Roots Radics and many others.

    “I knew Studio One spiritually before I knew Studio One physically. You know I grew up beside a dancehall and Sir Coxsone’s sound used to play there from when I was a boy. So from that influence you know I used to love Studio One sound so much, I became a sound selector. So that was my first involvement with getting to know Studio One music like The Heptones, Alton Ellis, Ken Booth, the whole works and that was my life from a youth.”

    After Sugar Minott’s debut many other artists followed suit at the label such as Freddie McGregor, Johnny Osbourne, Lone Ranger and Michigan & Smiley leading to one of the most creative periods for the label. This is the first retrospective of Sugar Minott at the label and most of these recordings have never been widely available outside Jamaica.

    • Sugar Minott – Vanity
    • Sugar Minott – Please Be True
    • Sugar Minott – Hang On Natty
    • Sugar Minott – Never Give Up
    • Sugar Minott – Jahovia
    • Sugar Minott – Give A Hand
    • Sugar Minott – Try Love
    • Sugar Minott – Roof Over My Head
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Jah Lead Us
    • Sugar Minott – Is It True
    • Sugar Minott – Love Gonna Pack Up
    • Sugar Minott – Give Me Jah Jah
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Jah Children
    • Sugar Minott – Party Time
    • Sugar Minott – Change Your Ways
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Almighty