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    100% Dynamite (New Edition)Soul Jazz Records

    This is the new digitally remastered expanded edition of Soul Jazz Records’ biggest ever selling reggae release, 100% Dynamite: Ska, Soul, Rocksteady and Funk in Jamaica.

    If you didn't get it the first time now's your chance to find out where it all began - all killer no filler!. If you did and wore it out get it now with bonus tracks and free download code!

    Since the album’s original release nearly twenty years ago, 100% Dynamite has become a cornerstone of funky reggae music: Eighteen killer tracks that show the influence that American Jazz, Funk and Soul music had on Jamaican Reggae.

    100% Dynamite features come serious Jamaican funk by Jackie Mittoo, The Upsetters and Toots & The Maytals, the cream of Jamaica's jazz musicians such as Tommy McCook, Cedric Brooks and Lennie Hibbert. Also included here are heavyweight Reggae versions to Soul classics by Marlena Shaw’s ‘Woman of the Ghetto’, Aretha Franklin’s ‘Rocksteady’, Syl Johnson’s ‘Is It Because I’m Black’, William DeVaughan’s seminal ‘Be Thankful’ and more.

    100% Dynamite also features revolutionary tunes such as Johnny Osbourne’s ‘We Need Love, Sound Dimension’s ‘Drum Song’ and Lloyd Robinson’s ‘Cuss Cuss’, songs that helped define a unique sound for Jamaican music in the sixties and seventies.

    These influences went both ways – check Brentford All Stars massive ‘Greedy G’, the basis for Boogie Down Productions’ ‘Jack of Spades’, or Willie Williams’ ‘Armagideon Time’ later covered by The Clash.

    This new expanded edition features seminal tracks from the greatest Jamaican producers – Clement Dodd, Lee Perry, Winston Riley (Techniques) and many more.

    The album is available as CD, heavyweight double vinyl (+download), plus digital.

    ORIGINAL REVIEWS

    "Compilation of the month" MUZIK

    "Brilliant" TIME OUT

    "Album of the week" MIXMAG

    "Compilation of the f***ing year" MELODY MAKER

    "Buy this excellent compilation immediately" MOJO

    "I think there’s a good argument to be made for 100% and 300% Dynamite records - along with Dave Godin’s Deep Soul Treasures (Taken From The Vaults) – Vol 1 & 2, Motown Chartbusters Vol. 3 and Blue Note: Blue Juice Vol. One - being among the finest compilations ever assembled. Anyone who has never heard Sister Nancy’s ‘Bam Bam’ or the Brentford Allstars' 'Greedy G' needs to remedy that situation straight away and anyone who is tired of hearing Althea & Donna’s ‘Uptown Top Ranking’, Willie Williams' 'Armageddon Time' and Wayne Smith’s ‘Under Me Sleng Teng’ needs to have a word with themselves anyway." THE QUIETUS

    • Willie Williams – Armageddon Time
    • The Maytals – Night and Day
    • The Marvels – Rock Steady
    • The Upsetters – Popcorn
    • Bunny Clarke – Be Thankful
    • Tommy McCook – Green Mango
    • Brentford All Stars – Greedy G
    • Lennie Hibbert – Real Hot
    • Horace Andy – My Soul
    • Johnny Osbourne – We Need Love
    • Bunny Clarke – I Love The Way You Love
    • Jackie Mittoo – Stereo Freeze
    • Phyllis Dillon – Woman Of The Ghetto
    • Cecric Im Brooks – Give Rasta Glory
    • Alton Ellis – Son Of Man
    • Sound Dimension – Granny Scratch Scratch
    • Lloyd Robinson – Cuss Cuss
    • Sound Dimension – Drum Song
    • Ken Boothe – Is It Because I'm Black
    The AbyssiniansDeclaration Of RightsSoul Jazz Records

    Stone-cold classic Studio One on limited-edition brand new 7" - loud, clean, boom!

    ALL TIME ROOTS ANTHEM!

    • The Abyssinians – Declaration Of Rights
    • The Abyssinians – Version
    Horace Andy / Jackie Mittoo Mr Bassie / Napoleon SoloSoul Jazz Records

    It's the bomb! Two massive Studio One cuts back to back.

    • Horace Andy – Mr. Bassie
    • Jackie Mittoo – Napoleon Solo
    Black Man's PrideSoul Jazz Records

    While the righteousness of blackness is at the heart of the Rastafarian faith, this collection illustrates how black pride remained a central theme, if not the defining essence, at the very core of all the music created at Studio One Records.

    Black Man’s Pride is the striking new Studio One collection of deep heavyweight reggae featuring Horace Andy, Alton Ellis, The Gladiators, Sugar Minott, The Heptones, Freddie McGregor, Cedric Brooks & more.

    In order to understand the centrality of black identity in the music created at Studio One, we need look no further than Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd who, who created the first black-owned record company in Jamaica.

    In similar fashion Alton Ellis’s defining ‘Black Man’s Pride’ brings up emotions that are at the heart of many of these uplifting songs. Alton Ellis’ birthplace was the Trench Town ghetto of Kingston, also the birthplace of The Wailers, Ken Boothe and many other Studio One luminaries.

    Clement Dodd established a musical empire firmly rooted by the core musicians working at Studio One many of whom came out of the Alpha School for Wayward Boys, run by Roman Catholic nuns, whose luminaries include Don Drummond, Johnny Moore, Leroy ‘Horsemouth’ Wallace, Cedric Brooks, Vin Gordon, Tommy McCook & more.

    Many of the songs featured here come from the transitory phase in reggae at the start of the 1970s. After the exhilaration of Ska and following the cooling down of Rocksteady. While reggae awaited the arrival of roots, Studio One’s vocalists were already producing some of the moodiest music imaginable! Here are 18 heavyweight tunes, both classic cuts and super-rare tunes!

    This new album is released as a heavyweight gatefold double-LP edition (+ download code), CD and digital with full text.

    REVIEW

    "The bottomless pit that is Coxsone Dodd’s Studio One label(s) yields more gems. Soul Jazz and before it, Heartbeat in the US, United Artists, Bamboo and various other labels in the UK have released numerous collections, yet the catalogue remains largely under-exploited, despite the late Mr Dodd’s tireless efforts to wring every last cent from it in unlikely ways. Little wonder that some reggae fans, spoilt by knowledge and racks of original vinyl, can be inclined to shrug when another comp emerges: there have been so many. However, Soul Jazz’s albums are different: not only have they encouraged a new, younger audience, parallel to the one that enjoys rare funk and spiritual jazz, to appreciate this music, their records are coherent. They’re not just a heap of tunes that happen to be sharing a black vinyl apartment. They’re themed and meld musically. They have a reason to exist.

    In this instance, that reason is an exploration of (mostly) 70s vocal roots reggae with a theme of black pride and dignity. This music was recorded as a cultural statement, if not a cry, from the roots; strong stuff, deep, dark and heavy. But don’t mistake that for leaden. It may have bass frequencies that drive your neighbour’s dog under the sofa, thinking it’s 5 November all over again, but this is no gloomy exercise in musical storm clouds. Right from Alton Ellis’s title-donating opening tune, there are aspects of Black Man’s Pride that will have you skipping around the room, literally or mentally, and thanking Jah that you didn’t spend the money it cost you on a pizza, dough balls and Diet Coke meal deal. This is not musical junk food, it’s a keeper fit to lift the heart whenever needed.

    One reason for this is the sequencing. Glen Miller (not that one) may have a light, soulful voice but the rhythm track he’s riding on Love And Understanding is a minor chord churner, as sad as a wet Sunday. But it’s held up on either side by Sugar Minott (and an uncredited Gladiators) floating through Woman Shadow (as sung by The Meditations as Woman Is Like A Shadow), and The Nightingales’ gorgeously swinging Rasta Is Calling, a glorious take on Delroy Wilson’s Cool Operator rhythm that’s a sod to find on 45. The Heptones make a rational case for Equal Rights in a manner that ought to have been perky enough to win them at least an audition for a CBBC presenter’s role. Their lead singer Leroy Sibbles pops up uncredited on John Holt’s heart-lifting yet cool Let’s Build Our Dreams. Heavy 70s roots is gloomy? Nope. Jamaica’s ghettos were suffering; they didn’t need more misery.

    There’s also judicious joining up of vocals and their dubwise 45 flipsides: The Gladiators’ Roots Natty is one such. I heard the vocal, and immediately wished it was the devastatingly moving dub cut. Compiler Stuart Baker evidently thought likewise, so it extends to the version. For variety, there’s a lone sax instrumental to wreck things up too: Cedric Brooks’ melodic Why Can’t I.

    There’s room for the unique, deep and breathy voice of Larry Marshall. More “international” stars Horace Andy and Dennis Brown are here too, recorded as youths, as is a teenage Freddie McGregor on a rootsy rewrite of Cat Stevens’ Wild World – with what sounds like JS Bach on synth! The set shuts with Johnny Osbourne’s sophisticated and spiritually openhearted Forgive Them.

    With an informative, eminently enjoyable sleeve note about the growth of roots reggae and its place in Rastafarianism and black awareness, fittingly Black Man’s Pride lacks nothing." Ian McCann, RECORD COLLECTOR

    • Alton Ellis – Black Man's Pride
    • Horace Andy – Child Of The Ghetto
    • Dennis Brown – Created By The Father
    • The Gladiators – Roots Natty
    • The Classics – Got To Be Cool
    • The Nightingales – Rasta Is Calling
    • Glen Miller – Love & Understanding
    • Sugar Minott – Woman Shadow
    • Lloyd Jones & The Supernatural Six – Red In A Babylon
    • Dudley Sibley & The Soul Gang – Love In Our Nation
    • The Heptones – Equal Rights
    • Glen Miller – You Must Be Love
    • Winston Jarrett – Up Park No Mans Land
    • Cedric Im Brooks – Why Can't I
    • Larry Marshall – Let's Make It Up
    • Freddie McGregor – Children Listen To The Wise Words
    • John Holt – Build Our Dreams
    • Johnny Osbourne – Forgive Them
    Black Man's Pride 2 (Studio One)Soul Jazz Records

    This is the second installment of deep roots Rastafarian reggae at Studio One and features classic music from some of the most important figures in reggae music – Alton Ellis, The Heptones, Jackie Mittoo, The Gladiators – alongside a host of rarities and little-known recordings, such as a truly rare Mystic Revelation of Rastafari seven-inch single, Willie William’s first ever recording ‘Calling’ and Horace Andy’s righteous (and equally rare) masterpiece ‘Illiteracy.’

    Black Man’s Pride 2 extends the legacy of Studio One’s ground-breaking path in roots reggae which began at the end of the 1960s and continued throughout the 1970s. The album tells the story of how the rise of Studio One Records and the Rastafari movement were interconnected, through the adoption of the Rastafari faith by key reggae artists – everyone from the Skatalites and Wailers in the 1960s, major singers such as Alton Ellis and Horace Andy at the end of the decade, through to major roots artists such as The Gladiators in the 1970s – and how Clement Dodd consistently recorded this heavyweight roots music throughout Studio One’s history.

    The extensive sleeve-notes to this album also discuss the links between Rastafari and Studio One in time and place, noting how both the religion and Clement Dodd’s musical empire had their roots in the intense period of pre-independence Jamaica in Kingston, expanded in the 1960s following the visit of Haile Selassie in 1966, and how roots music then came to dominate reggae music in the early 1970s. Also discussed is how the outsider stance of both reggae music and the Rastafari movement relate back many hundreds of years to the original rebel stance of the Maroons, escaped slaves who set up self-sufficient enclaves in the hills of the Jamaican countryside.

    There is also a track-by-track history by the noted Studio One writer Rob Chapman (Never Grow Old). This new album comes as heavyweight gatefold double vinyl (+ download code), deluxe CD and digital album.

    REVIEWS of Black Man's Pride:

    "Soul Jazz’s albums are different: not only have they encouraged a new, younger audience, parallel to the one that enjoys rare funk and spiritual jazz, to appreciate this music, their records are coherent. They’re not just a heap of tunes that happen to be sharing a black vinyl apartment. They’re themed and meld musically. They have a reason to exist.
    In this instance, that reason is an exploration of 70s vocal roots reggae with a theme of black pride and dignity." Record Collector

    • Horace Andy – Illiteracy
    • The Heptones – Be A Man
    • The Manchesters – Natty Gone
    • The Gladiators – Down Town Rebel
    • Willie Williams – Calling
    • Roland Alphonso & Brentford All Stars – Sir D Special
    • Keith Wilson – God I God I Say
    • Alton Ellis – Almost Anything
    • Bobby Kalphat & The New Establishment – Adis A Wa Wa
    • Peter Broggs – Sing A New Song
    • Mystic Revelations Of Rastafari – Let Freedom Reign
    • Larry & Alvin – Free I Lord
    • Ernest Wilson & The Sound Dimension – Freedom Fighter
    • Jackie Mittoo – Happy People
    • Prince Lincoln – Daughters Of Zion
    • High Charles – Zion
    • Winston Jarrett – Love Jah Jah
    • 2xLP + Download Code£23.00
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    • CD£12.00
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    • MP3 Release£7.99
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    Studio One Black Man's Pride 3 : None Shall Escape The Judgement Of The AlmightySoul Jazz Records

    This is the latest new installment of Soul Jazz Records’ on-going collection of Rastafarian music at Studio One, featuring classic material from legendary roots and culture artists The Gladiators, Horace Andy, Freddie McGregor, Sugar Minott and the Wailing Souls, alongside a superb selection of rarities from Sir Coxsone’s musical empire made up of one-off and practically unknown Rastafarian artists who recorded on a myriad of Studio One off-shoot labels in the 1970s – The Manchesters, Mellodies, The Nightingales and others.

    In this new collection, we see that once again the prescient Clement Dodd was a man who saw the wider picture. In the 1960s it was Sir Coxsone who identified the creative potential of The Wailers, Toots and the Maytals, Heptones, Burning Spear and many, many others. In the 1970s Studio One released an untouchable selection of the finest as styles moved from reggae to deejay to dub and, in the latter half, the emergence of dancehall.

    But what is also clear is that throughout this era Studio One released an incredible amount of roots music, and not just the most commercially obvious. For alongside the career-building catalogues of Burning Spear, The Wailing Souls, The Gladiators and so on, one needs to be an ardent Studio One collector to know some of the truly raw Rastafarian music featured here. Groups such as The Manchesters or The Nightingales feel as if they were recorded straight out of the churchical chants of the mansions.

    Black Man’s Pride explains the links between the ideology of Clement Dodd at Studio One and the Rastafarian faith, which was the creation of Afro-Jamaicans and concerned above all else with a black consciousness and empowerment, a rediscovering of the personal and racial identity of black people. The movement began in the 1930s and, in tandem with this black consciousness, called for a rejection of the British imperial culture that dominated Jamaica, while creating an identity based on a re-appropriation of an African heritage.

    The Rastafari movement was like a pivot, bringing together and balancing many vectors of ideologies. Marcus Garvey’s Back to Africa movement, trades union discourse, anti-colonialism and nation independence, maroon self-definition and independence, the spirit of African rebellion in the Caribbean. For Clement Dodd, a black man and producer growing up in Kingston in this era, Rastafari was simply a part of his everyday world – from witnessing Count Ossie’s grounations to the faith of many Jamaican artists at Studio One – from the Skatalites onwards.

    Featured here alongside these classic and rare tracks from Studio One are new and extensive sleeve notes with track-by-track notes by Rob Chapman, author of the acclaimed Downbeat Special and Never Grow Old Studio One books.

    The album is released as double heavyweight gatefold vinyl (+ free download code), CD with slipcase and booklet, and digital album.

    • Horace Andy – Conscious Dread Lock
    • The Gladiators – A Prayer To Thee
    • Freddie McGregor – Beat Down Babylon
    • The Manchesters – Selassie Bandman
    • The Mellodies – Dread Oppression
    • Big Joe – Jah Jah Help Us
    • Horace Andy – Oh Lord Why Lord
    • Lloyd Jones & The Super Natural Six – Get Up and Try
    • The Wailing Souls – Can't Catch Me
    • The Nightingales – Jehovah
    • Alphanso Stewart – It's No Secret
    • Errol Dunkley – Satisfaction
    • Mr Manchester – Give Natty Dread Glory
    • Lincoln (Sugar) Minott – Wrong Doers
    • Noel Campbell & The Gladiators Band – Sufferation
    • African Brothers – No Cup No Brock
    • Zoot Simms – When The Time Comes
    • Glen Miller – Whey No Dead
    Brentford All StarsGreedy G / Granny Scratch ScratchSoul Jazz Records

    These are very limited Studio One 12" pressings (worldwide 1000) that sell out on the day they are released. So don't miss out here!

    BRAND NEW LTD. EDN. 12" All-time Studio One party ANTHEM. 100% ESSENTIAL MONSTER TUNE - ROCKS ANY DANCEFLOOR!

    'Greedy G’ is the ultimate reggae/funk/hip-hop party tune.

    The all-time epic sample for Boogie Down Productions’ seminal ‘Jack of Spades’ based on James Brown’s funk bomb ‘Get on the Good Foot’.

    The flipside is another Brentford Road All Stars essential cut, ‘Granny Scratch Scratch’, the heaviest, funkiest dub monster ever with bass to shake more speakers than a juggernaut lorry!

    Boom!


    • – Greedy G
    • – Granny Scratch Scratch
    Brentford All Stars / Im and Sound DimensionGreedy G / Love JahSoul Jazz Records

    All time B-Boy classic! First time ever on 7" single! 100% Essential tune rocks every party! KILLER!

    • Brentford All Stars – Greedy G
    • Im and Sound Dimension – Love Jah
    Brown SugarI'm In Love With A Dreadlocks: Brown Sugar and The Birth Of Lovers Rock 1977 - 80Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing this first ever collection of the pioneering British reggae Lovers Rock group Brown Sugar including rare singles, dubs and extended mixes. The album comes with extensive sleevenotes and interviews with Dennis Bovell, Pauline Catlin, John Kpiaye and Winston Edwards (Studio 16).

    Brown Sugar were formed by three young teenage girls – Pauline Catlin, Caron Wheeler and Carol Simms in South London in 1976. In the short period of time 1976-1980, the group – working with Dennis Bovell on the mixing desk and John Kpiaye (‘Brownie T) in the studio – recorded barely a handful of singles on the new Lovers Rock label, a number of which went to the top of the UK reggae charts. But success stopped there, and with no album release and no industry support the group broke up in the early 1980s.

    Following their split Caron Wheeler became the lead vocalist for the hugely successful group Soul II Soul, Carol Simms launched a solo career as Kofi (re-making a number of Brown Sugar songs with producer Mad Professor) and Pauline Catlin returned to education.

    Despite their relatively low-key mainstream public exposure Brown Sugar (and the label on which their first records appeared) announced to the world a new genre of reggae music, Lovers Rock, which spoke for the first time with the sensibility of a new segment of British society; that of first generation-born Black British female youth.

    And while Lovers Rock became synonymous with sweet love songs, Brown Sugar’s music in fact expressed far more; a righteous pride and consciousness in being Black and British, a political stance more often associated with UK roots groups like Black Slate, Aswad, Misty in Roots and other British reggae acts in the late 1970s. Brown Sugar were in fact their own genre of ‘conscious lovers rock’ – an expression of ideological black cultural pride.

    Brown Sugar’s handful of three-minute love songs (often plus extended dubs) somehow manage to encapsulate all the complexities of identity, sexual politics and youthful righteousness of Afro-Caribbean youth living in Britain in the 1970s. Songs such as ‘I’m in Love with A Dreadlocks’, ‘Our Reggae Music’, ‘Black Pride’ and ‘Dreaming of Zion’ spoke with a straightforward righteousness and consciousness that few roots groups could hope to match. The fact that they were all teenagers is even more striking.

    In the mid-70s British reggae came into being as first generation Black Britain was able to find a voice able to express the issues of growing up British with Caribbean roots. This came about in two different ways – the British roots music of (essentially male) groups such as Aswad, Steel Pulse and Black Slate – and Lovers Rock, the expression of a black essentially (but not totally) female consciousness – Brown Sugar, Louisa Mark, 15-16-17, Marie Pierre, Janet Kay, Carroll Thompson, Jean Adebambo and others. And significantly, while British roots music was a variant on a Jamaican style, Lovers Rock was uniquely British – the first authentic British reggae sound.

    Dennis Bovell comments, “For Lovers Rock we needed a pulpit, a way of saying ‘this is the style’. Sound systems were already saying ‘this is lovers,’ brandishing it in the dance. Our intention was to create a style of music that my generation could identify with – one that had a beat, and you could dance to with your partner in a sound system setting.”

    Dennis Bovell’s mixes for the group gave a further dimension to Brown Sugar records – a sound system mentality, adding sound effects and dub elements. ‘I’m in Love with A Dreadlocks’ was the debut release for both Brown Sugar and the Lovers Rock label, a fitting calling card for both. The record was a hit on many sound systems across the UK, reaching the top of the reggae charts.

    John Kpiaye: “They never put out an album. And all these records were seven-inch singles; when 12-inches turned up it just killed the seven-inch.”

    Although the career of Brown Sugar was short-lived, their legacy and influence remains significant and now, 40 years on from these first records, all of the members are still involved in music. Pauline Catlin has recently re-launched her career under a new moniker, Shezekiel; Carol Simms, aka Kofi, remains a successful solo artist, one of the queens of Lovers Rock; Caron Wheeler, after leaving Soul II Soul at the end of the 1980s, embarked on a solo career, before re-joining the soul super-group which she continues to front to this day.

    This new collection brings together all the groups essential recordings for the first ever time and is released as double gatefold heavyweight vinyl + free download (+ full sleevenotes), CD with large booklet, and digital album.

    • – Black Pride
    • – Our Reggae Music
    • – Hello Stranger
    • – I'm In Love With A Dreadlocks
    • – Hurtin' (with Dennis Bovell)
    • – I'm So Proud
    • – Runaway Love
    • – Dreaming Of Zion
    • – Loving Dreadlocks Dub
    • – You and Your Smiling Face
    • – Do You Really Love Me
    • – Proud
    • – Confession Hurts
    Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation Of RastafariTales Of MozambiqueSoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation’s seminal 1975 album Tales of Mozambique in an expanded double album/single CD/digital format, fully remastered and with the inclusion of two bonus rare single-only tracks, full sleevenotes, exclusive photographs and interview.

    Count Ossie is the central character in the development of Rastafarian roots music, nowadays an almost mythical and iconic figure. His importance in bringing Rastafarian music to a populist audience is matched only by Bob Marley’s promotion of the faith internationally in the 1970s.

    Count Ossie’s drummers performed on the first commercially released single to integrate Rastafarian traditional music with popular music: the vocal group The Folkes Brothers’ groundbreaking song ‘Oh Carolina’, recorded for producer Prince Buster in 1959. In 1966 his drummers greeted the momentous arrival of Haile Selassie at Kingston airport.

    His legendary jam sessions up in his Rastafarian compound in the hills of Wareika, Kingston, are famous for the many Jamaican musicians who attended including The Skatalites players – Roland Alphonso, Don Drummond, Johnny Moore, Lloyd Knibbs – and many others.

    The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari formed in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1970, a union of Count Ossie’s Rastafarian drummers – variously known as his African Drums, Wareikas or his Afro-Combo – and the saxophonist Cedric Im Brooks’ horns group, The Mystics.

    The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari are the defining group in bringing authentic Rastafarian rhythms into the collective consciousness of popular music, their unique music is at once rooted in the deep traditions and rituals of traditional drumming and chanting alongside a forward-thinking, even avant-garde, artistry influenced by the likes of John Coltrane, Sun Ra, Pharoah Sanders and other pioneering African-American jazz artists radicalised and charged by the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

    Tales of Mozambique is a truly unique and fascinating ground-breaking album.

    Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari are the central group featured on Soul Jazz Records recent "Rastafari - The Dreads Enter Babylon” a collection showing the influence of Rastafari in Reggae and Jamaican popular culture.

    Soul Jazz Records will also be releasing Count Ossie and The Rasta Family 'Man From Higher Heights’ in the near future.

    * Bonus tracks

    REVIEWS

    " All roads in Rastafarian roots music lead to Count Ossie.He’s the lead character in this compelling subplot, the musician who was one of the first to put Rasta tenets into the heart of popular music.

    He did so from his camp in the hills above Kingston, Count Ossie and his drummers casting a spell on the musicians who gathered to check him out and then went on to spread the word about the powerful nyabinghi rhythms and mesmerising percussion.

    This is a reissue of the 1975 album Count Ossie made with his Rastafarian drummers and saxaphonist Cedric ‘Im’ Brooks’s group The Mystics.

    It’s a groundbreaking, majestic work, by turns righteous in tone and joyous in execution. It’s the sound of Ossie and his ensemble narrating a history lesson and you’d be daft not to want to find out more."  IRISH TIMES

    • – Sam's Intro
    • – Tales Of Mozambique
    • – Selam Nna Wadada (Peace & Love)
    • – No Night In Zion
    • – I Am A Warrior
    • – Wicked Babylon
    • – Let Freedom Reign
    • – Lock, Stock And Barrel
    • – Nigerian Reggae
    • – Run One Mile
    • – Rasta Reggae*
    • – Samia*
    Count Ossie & The Rasta FamilyMan From Higher HeightsSoul Jazz Records

    This album is a strictly 1000-copies only worldwide digitally remastered exact repro LP+ download code. Also available as a very limited Japanese card sleeve edition CD - first copies only! Also digital album.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing Count Ossie and The Rasta Family’s long lost reggae album ‘Man From Higher Heights’ (originally released in 1983), digitally remastered and with full original artwork.

    This release follows on from the earlier release of Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari ‘Tales of Mozambique’ (1975) also by Soul Jazz Records.

    Recorded in Kingston, Jamaica, somewhere between the last Mystic Revelation album and the 1983 official release of ‘Man From Higher Heights’ it remains unclear whether this album is a mixture of original recordings overlayed with additional players, or Ossie’s post-Mystic Revelation players remaining true to the spirit of Count Ossie (who had died in a car crash in 1976).

    Either way it is a fascinating and successful blend of heavyweight Rastafarian roots rhythms and drumming alongside deep jazz improvisation and tripped out psychedelic fuzz guitar.

    The album was first released in 1983 on the British label VIsta Sounds with no mention of the line-up of the group. It has been out of print for over 30 years and remains one of the most mysterious of all releases relating to Count Ossie and the Mystic Revelation of Rastafari.

    Count Ossie is the central character in the development of Rastafarian roots music, an almost mythical and iconic figure. His importance in bringing Rastafarian music to a populist audience is matched only by Bob Marley’s promotion of the faith internationally in the 1970s.

    Count Ossie’s drummers made the first ever song to integrate Rastafarian traditional music into popular music - The Folkes Brothers’ song ‘Oh Carolina’, recorded for producer Prince Buster in 1959. In 1966 his drummers greeted the arrival of Haile Selassie at Kingston airport. His Rastafarian compound in the hills of Wareika, Kingston, hosted jam sessions between his drummers and Jamaica’s finest musicians, Roland Alphonso, Don Drummond, Johnny Moore and others.

    Count Ossie and the Group’s Man From Higher Heights remains one of the most elusive of his highly progressive Rastafarian inspired recordings, the final release in Count Ossie’s career.

    Also available:

    Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari – Tales of Mozambique (SJR LP/CD235)

    Rastafari – The Dreads Enter Babylon 1955-83 (SJR LP/CD312)

    • – Africa We Want Fe Go
    • – Cruisng Down The Line
    • – Misfits
    • – Crossing River Jordan
    • – Mystic Memories
    • – Drums For Wise Man
    • – Chanting Higher Heights
    Coxsone's MusicSoul Jazz Records

    Coxsone's Music is a stunning new 3-CD/two separate double LP (+ free download) collection featuring over two and half hours of early Jamaican proto-ska, rhythm and blues, jazz, rastafari and gospel music - charting the earliest recordings produced by Clement Dodd, in the years before he launched the mighty Studio One Records, brought together here for the first time ever. 

    Clement Dodd's Sir Coxsone The Downbeat Soundsystem ruled Kingston's dancehalls during this era and these recordings strongly reflect the influences of American rhythm and blues and jump jazz on Jamaican music fans. By the time the new record company formed in Brentford Road, Kingston in 1963, the young Clement 'Sir Coxsone' Dodd had already managed to release an incredible wealth of recordings by the talented musicians and artists on the island of Jamaica and this collection reflects just that:

    Featuring Don Drummond, Roland Alphonso, Derrick Harriott, Owen Gray, Clancy Eccles, Count Ossie, Monty Alexander, The Blues Busters, Ernest Ranglin, Rico Rodriguez and many, many more all captured here in their formative early years. 

    Before Studio One, Clement Dodd released this music on a variety of his early record labels such as Worldisc, All Stars, Coxsone, D Darling (named after Coxsone's mother, who received a production credit on the label), Muzik City (named after Dodd's record store on East Queen's Street), Port O Jam, Supreme and Sensational. Sleevenotes to this collection are by Studio One authority Rob Chapman, author of the Never Grow Old and Downbeat Special books cataloguing the many recordings of the label.

    (Vinyl Double Record A is tracks 1-24, Vinyl Double Record B is tracks 25-46)

    • Don Drummond – Roll On Sweet Don
    • Derrick Harriott – Answer Me
    • Aubrey Adams – Do Du Wap
    • Busty & Cool – What A World
    • Roland Alphonso – Counter Punch
    • Owen & Millie – Do You Know
    • Workshop Musicians – Calypso Jazz
    • Don Drummond – Elevation Rock
    • The Blues Busters – There's Always Sunshine
    • Clue J and his Blues Blasters – Unkown Shuffle Blues
    • The Jiving Juniors – Darling Don't Leave Me
    • The Mellow Larks – Time To Pray
    • Owen Gray – Twisting My Baby
    • Cecil Loyd Quintet – What Is The Thing Called Love
    • Theo Beckford – That's Me
    • Simms & Robinson – White Christmas
    • Cecil Lloyd Quintet – Sometimes I'm Happy
    • Owen Gray – Best Twist
    • The Blues Busters – Tell Me Why
    • Don Drummond – Dew Drops
    • Clancy Eccles – River Jordan
    • Workshop Musicians – Serenade In Sound
    • Owen Gray – Young Lover
    • The City Slickers – Oceans 11
    • The Blues Busters – You Had It All Wrong
    • Clue J and his Blues Blasters – Salt Lane Shuffle
    • Lascelles Perkins – Real Gone Clown
    • Don Drummond – Reload
    • Clancy Eccles – Freedom
    • Clue J and his Blues Blasters – Pine Juice
    • The Jiving Juniors – Over The River
    • Don Drummond – Schooling The Duke
    • The Mellow Cats & Count Ossie – Rock A Man Soul
    • Monty & The Cyclones – Summertime
    • The Mellowlarks – No More Wedding
    • Roland Alphonso & Carol McLaughlin – Just Cool
    • Owen & Millie – Sugar Plum
    • Clue J and his Blues Blasters – Silky
    • Basil Gabbidon – Independent Blues
    • Don Drummond and The City Slickers – That Man Is Back
    • Simms & Robinson – Searching
    • The Shinners – Romantic Shuffle
    • Cecil Lloyd Quintet – Grooving With The Beat
    • Neville Esson – I Do
    • Workshop Musicians – Burnie's Tune
    • Owen & Millie – Sit and Cry
    Coxsone's Music 2 : The Sound Of Young JamaicaSoul Jazz Records

    Over 40 tracks!

    This is the second collection to bring together many of the visionary producer Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd’s early recordings made with Jamaica’s most exciting young artists and musicians who helped define the world of reggae music over the decades following Jamaican Independence.

    These recordings were made when Sir Coxsone ruled the dancehalls of Kingston in the late 1950s and early 1960s with his number one Downbeat Sound System, where songs were tested out on dub plates at a dance to see a crowd’s reaction - the most popular of which were then released commercially.

    Featuring early material by Roland Alphonso, Don Drummond, Tommy McCook (all of whom would form The Skatalites), Toots and The Maytals, young singers such as Bob Marley and The Wailers, Delroy Wilson, Owen Gray all captured in their formative days.

    The music here spans a wealth of styles – Jamaican rhythm and blues, jazz, gospel, proto-ska, Rastafarian – all of which were drawn upon to create the future sounds of Jamaican reggae that Sir Coxsone and the artists featured would soon create at Studio One which opened its doors in 1963.

    This collection is released on heavyweight triple-vinyl plus download code, double CD with slipcase and digital download. Sleevenotes and text is by the author Noel Hawks.

    • Roland and his Alley Cats – Jerk Pork
    • Neville Esson – Lovers Jive
    • Monty & The Cyclones – Lazy Lou
    • Owen Gray – Get Drunk
    • Monty & The Cyclones – Dog It
    • Clancy Eccles – More Proof
    • Tommy McCook & The Skatalites – Exodus
    • Clue J and his Blues Blasters – Swanee River Rock
    • Delroy Wilson – Spit In The Sky
    • Roland Alphonso – Federal Special
    • Owen Gray – Grandma Grandpa
    • Don Drummond – Cuban Blockade
    • Theophilus Beckford With Clue J & His City Slickers – Little Lady
    • Tommy McCook – Away From You
    • Clancy Eccles With Hersan & His City Slickers – I Live And I Love
    • Roland Alphonso and His Alley Cats – Hully Gully Rock
    • Delroy Wilson – Lion Of Judah
    • Tommy McCook – Two For One
    • Toots & The Maytals – Sweet Sweet Jenny
    • Roland Alphonso – Grand National
    • Owen Gray With Hersan & His City Slickers – Sinners Weep and Mourn
    • Tommy McCook – Peanut Vendor
    • Toots & The Maytals – Shining Light
    • Lascelles Perkins with Clue J & His Blues Blasters  – Lonely Moments
    • Toots & The Maytals – Six and Seven Books Of Moses
    • Cecil Lloyd – It Happens
    • Bonny & Scully – Don't Do It
    • Don Drummond – Scrap Iron
    • Lascelles Perkins with Clue J & His Blues Blasters  – Creation
    • Tommy McCook – Don't Slam The Door
    • Winston & Bibbie and The Rhythm Aces – Joybells Of Independence
    • Roland Alphonso – Jack Ruby
    • Toots & The Maytals – Hallelujah
    • Bob Marley & The Wailers – Habits
    • Frank Anderson & Tommy McCook – Wheel and Turn
    • Busty & Cool – Kingston To Mo'Bay
    • Don Drummond – Mr Propman
    • Higgs & Wilson – Mighty Man
    • Tommy McCook and Roland Alphonso – Trotting In
    • Bunny & Skitter with Count Ossie and His Wareikas – Cool Breeze
    • The Mellow Larks – Light Of My Life
    Dancehall (2017 edition)Soul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing this new 10th anniversary 2017 edition of their classic album  ‘Dancehall – The Rise of Jamaican Dancehall Culture’. This long-out-of-print collection is now available as a triple-vinyl edition and double CD pack.

    The album is a lightning-flash collection of all-time classic and definitive dancehall classics as well as a stellar selection of more obscure tracks. Featuring Yellowman, Tenor Saw, Sister Nancy, Ini Kamoze, Chaka Demus & Pliers, Michigan & Smiley, Super Cat, Cutty Ranks, Eek-A-Mouse, Gregory Isaacs and more, this album features non-stop floor-filling party tune rockers throughout!

    Dancehall is released to coincide with the new 2017 edition of the stunning 400+ photos deluxe coffee table book ‘Dancehall – The Rise of Jamaican Dancehall Culture’, featuring Beth Lesser’s amazing Dancehall photography (also newly published by Soul Jazz Records). This book has become the definitive cultural reference book for Jamaican dancehall and features hundreds of killer photographs, extensive text and interviews with many of the artists.

    ‘A vibrant anthology of all that mattered: the sound systems, studios, producers, singers and deejays.’  The Guardian

    • Yellowman – Bam Bam
    • Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly
    • Reggie Stepper – Cu Oonuh
    • Chaka Demus and Pliers – Murder She Wrote
    • Pinchers – Agony
    • Michigan & Smiley – Diseases
    • Ini Kamoze – World A Music
    • Junior Murvin – Cool Out Son
    • General Echo – Arleen
    • Cornel Campbell – Boxing
    • Cutty Ranks – Chop Chop
    • Lone Ranger – M16
    • Super Cat – Trash and Ready
    • Gregory Isaacs – Soon Forward
    • Jacob Miller & Trinity – I'm Just A Dread / One Shot
    • Eek A Mouse – Wa Do Dem
    • Sister Nancy – Only Woman DJ With Degree
    • Trinity – Uptown Girl
    • General Echo – Track Shoes
    • Cornel Campbell – Mash You Down
    • Horace Ferguson – Sensi Addict
    • Clint Eastwood – Jump and Pawn
    Dub Echoes - AlbumSonic Excursions In Dub and BeyondSoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records' journey into Dub and beyond, released to coincide with the new DVD film. Featuring an array of both legendary and current artists and producers connected to Dub.


    This monster double CD / triple LP is a lightning journey through Dub featuring Jamaican originators such as King Tubby, Lee Perry, Prince Jammy and Bunny Lee, alongside electronic futurists and Dubstep artists such as Kode9, Harmonic 313 (Warp) and LV (Hyperdub), as well as hip hop pioneer Roots Manuva and original junglist Congo Natty. Musical worlds collide as Francois Kervorkian meets Jamaican DJ legend U-Roy, and German techno giants Rhythm & Sound meet Cornell Campbell.


    This album is a celebration of all things Dub and related, featuring rare classics alongside new tracks from the pioneers and futurists of this electronic musical form.

    REVIEWS
    The Times 

    • Roots Manuva – Witness (Walworth Road Rockers Dub)
    • Rebel MC / Congo Natty – Creation Rebel
    • Disrupt – Sega Beats
    • Dub Syndicate – Forever More
    • Harmonic 313 – Dirtbox
    • King Tubby – Psalms of Drums
    • Kode9 and Spaceape – Sine Of The Dub
    • Andre 'Suku' Gray – Sign Rhythm
    • U Roy and Francois K – Rootsman
    • King Tubby – Ruffer Version
    • LV featuring Dandelion – CCTV
    • Rhythm & Sound with Cornell Campbell – King In My Empire
    • King Tubby – Jah Jah Jehovah Version
    • Digital Dubs vs. Dubiterian – Deb Dub
    • The Congos – Congo Man Chant
    • Cotti – Run Tings
    • The Upsetters – Rejoicing Skank
    Fire Over Babylon: Dread, Peace and Conscious Sounds at Studio OneSoul Jazz Records

    Soul Jazz Records’ new Studio One collection ‘Fire Over Babylon: Dread, Peace and Conscious Sounds at Studio One’ features a stellar selection of 70s roots music – classic and rare tracks recorded at Clement Dodd’s musical empire at 13 Brentford Road in the 1970s.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Rastafarian-inspired Roots music was an ever-important aspect of Studio One’s output from the start of the 1970s onwards and this album features many of the ground-breaking groups and artists that established the sound of Jamaica during this decade and beyond.

    Featured here are seminal artists such as Freddie McGregor, The Wailing Souls, The Gladiators, Horace Andy, Devon Russell, Cedric Brooks, Count Ossie, Judah Eskender Tafari alongside a host of lesser-known rare cuts made at Studio One from artists such as The Prospectors, Viceroys and Pablove Black.

    Studio One and founder Clement Dodd’s connection with Rastafarianism dates back to the early 1960s, with Dodd accompanying members of the Skatalites up to the hills of Kingston to listen to the music of the Rastafarianism Count Ossie and his drummers. The album sleevenotes discuss how Clement Dodd’s musical links, as well as his role in heading the most important record label in Reggae, are in many ways linked to the beliefs of Rastafarianism.

    This album is released as a heavyweight black vinyl double-album with gatefold sleeve, full notes and download code, deluxe CD with full booklet and slipcase and digital album.

    • Freddie McGregor – I Am a Revolutionist
    • The Silvertones – Burning In My Soul
    • Wailing Souls – Without You
    • Devon Russell – Jah Jah Fire
    • Trevor Clarke – Sufferation
    • The Gladiators – Sonia
    • Judah Eskender Tafari – Always Trying
    • The Viceroys – Ya Ho
    • Im and Count Ossie – Give Me Back Me Language And Me Culture
    • The Gladiators – Serious Thing
    • The Prospectors – Glory For I
    • Wailing Souls – Things and Time
    • Pablove Black – Inner Peace
    • The Gladiators – Peace
    • Horace Andy – Mr. Jolly Man
    • Wailing Souls – Rock But Don't Fall
    • Albert Griffiths and The Gladiators – Righteous Man
    • The Viceroys – So Many Problems
    Marcia GriffithsFeel Like Jumping / Part 2Soul Jazz Records

    IN STOCK NOW!

    BRAND NEW LTD. EDN. 12" All-time Studio One party ANTHEM now available for the first time ever on loud 12" with version on the flip. 100% ESSENTIAL MONSTER TUNE - ROCKS ANY DANCEFLOOR!

    • Marcia Griffiths – Feel Like Jumping
    • Dub Specialist – Feel Like Jumping Part 2
    Horace Andy / Dub SpecialistSkylarking / Sky RhythmSoul Jazz Records

    All-time classic Studio One tune. 100% ESSENTIAL

    • Horace Andy – Skylarking
    • Dub Specialist – Sky Rhythm
    Hustle! Reggae Disco (Expanded Edition)Soul Jazz Records

    Expanded edition which now features five extra tracks!

    This ground-breaking album features non-stop killer reggae versions of original funk and soul classics in a disco style. Reggae disco updates of seminal classics by Anita Ward (‘Ring My Bell’), Chaka Khan (‘I’m Every Woman’), Michael Jackson ‘Don’t Stop ‘til You Get Enough,’ Sugarhill Gang (‘Rappers Delight’ here performed by Derrick Laro & Trinity for producer Joe Gibbs) and more, all showing the hidden but inseparable link between the dance floors of New York, Kingston and London.

    New bonus tracks to this collection include Derrick Harriott’s funky take on Eddie Drennon’s ‘Do It Nice and Easy’, the classic disco reggae of Risco Connection’s performing McFadden and Whitehead’s ‘Ain’t No Stopping Us Now’ and the London rare groove lovers rock of Charmaine Burnett singing Barbara Acklin’s soul classic ‘Am I The Same Girl’.

    ‘Hustle! Reggae Disco’ has been one of Soul Jazz Records’ best-selling releases since its first release 15 years ago (and subsequently featured heavily in the early Grand Theft Auto games!). This new edition comes complete fully re-mastered and with all original titles plus new tracks. This new expanded edition now comes as a triple album (+ download code), CD and digital album.

    ‘The effect of American R&B and soul music on Jamaican reggae is well documented, but the story doesn't stop there, for disco (and more so now for rap and hip-hop) have also been subsumed into the reggae mix, and while one might suspect that the resulting hybrid would die of its own implausibility, the feral mix of disco with reggae rhythms is so darn infectious that it hardly matters. Once you take your brain out of the frame and just let your feet go, this collection is a dancer's delight all done up in full-blown disco style, but with huge dub-style rhythm tracks … if you're looking for an impossibly infectious dance collection, this is it.’ All Music

    • Blood Sisters – Ring My Bell
    • Derrick Laro and Trinity – Don't Stop Til You Get Enough
    • Chariot Riders – Do It Nice & Easy
    • Black Harmony – Don't Let It Go To Your Head
    • Latisha – I'm Every Woman
    • Ernest Ranglin – In The Rain
    • Family Choice – Reggae Beat Goes On
    • Risco Connection – Ain't No Stopping Us Now
    • Xanadu and Sweet Lady – Rappers Delight
    • Sharon Forrester – Love Don't Live Here Any More
    • Carol Cool – Upside Down
    • One Blood – Be Thankful For What You've Got
    • Charmaine Burnett – Am I The Same Girl
    • 1. Blood Sisters – Ring My Bell
    • 2. Derrick Laro and Trinity – Don't Stop Til You Get Enough
    • 3. Chariot Riders – Do It Nice & Easy
    • View full info and tracklisting
    Invasion Of The Mysteron Killer Sounds in 3-DSoul Jazz Records

    Kevin Martin (aka The Bug) and Stuart Baker (Soul Jazz Records) have collaborated on a unique project bringing together new, exclusive and in-demand cutting-edge digital music by electronic futurists such Harmonic 313, Diplo, Roots Manuva, South Rakkas Crew and The Bug alongside music from the pioneering electronic scientific dub and radical producers of the Jamaican digital dancehall revolution in music - King Jammy, Steely and Clevie, Sly Dunbar, Prince Jazzbo, King Tubby, Dave Kelly, Firehouse Crew and many more.


    Like the music of The Bug himself (whose seminal ‘London Zoo’ album is an apocalyptic mixture of dancehall, dubstep and grime), the new digital producers featured here all create work that is contemporary (whether dubstep, acid, hip-hop, electronic) and yet linked in some way back to Jamaican dancehall - especially the new digital styles that exploded out of Kingston in the 1980s with King Jammy’s revolutionary computer-based sounds.


    Producer King Jammy learnt his trade under the greatest of all dub producers King Tubby, and this music constantly references back to the origins of dub - but whereas Tubby’s revolution used echo-chambers and analogue tape-splicing, the Jamaican producers featured here were the first to use and embrace computer technology.


    The double album comes in limited edition heavyweight deluxe hardcover 2-CD card-casing complete with a limited-edition graphic novel by Italian comic book designer Paolo Parisi (whose books include subjects as diverse as John Coltrane and Chernobyl). This specially commissioned graphic novel is a science-fiction vision of the future of digital music, featuring King Tubby, Steely and Clevie, Jammy, Jazzbo, complete with Alien Sound Lord Abductors, Aural Freedom Fighters and Digi-Dub Voyagers!


    There are also two super-heavy, super-loud, deluxe gatefold double-vinyl editions (with the first copies also including a limited edition graphic-novel in volume 1 and a free poster in volume 2).
    Invasion of the Killer Mysteron Sounds brings together the most exciting electronic producers in Jamaica with current sound artists in the UK and beyond who all create music based on revolutionary sounds in 3D – Dancehall, Digital and Dub.


     PITCHFORK REVIEW HERE

    • Steely & Clevie – Street Sweeper
    • Lenky & Sly – Now Thing
    • Roots Manuva – Doogoo Dub
    • Dave Kelly – The Return
    • Harvel 'Gadaffi' Hart – Summer Bounce
    • Federation Sound – Flatlands (Brooklyn Dub Mix)
    • Steven 'Lenky' Marsden – Diwali
    • Matt Shadetek – Yoga Rhythm
    • Stereotyp ft. Alleycat – Modern Times
    • Da Grynch and Tippa Irie – Agony
    • Fresh Ear Productions – Hummer
    • Diplo – Diplo Rhythm
    • Harmonic 313 – Bazooka Riddim
    • Marlon Williams – Pitbull
    • Redlight – MDMA
    • The Bug – Aktion
    • Fat Eyes – Clothes Pin
    • Steven Ventura – Throw Your Hands Up
    • Sly Dunbar and Christopher Birch – Corners Boy
    • David Jahson – King of Kings
    • Fat Eyes – Steel Plate
    • South Rakkas Crew – Red Alert
    • Parara and McCoy – Them Can't Hold Yuh Girl
    • King Tubby – Fat Thing Version
    • World Beat – Goldmine
    • Andre 'Suku' Gray – Sign
    • Henfield and Shadowman – Babatunde
    • Firehouse Crew – No False Hair
    • Computer Paul – World Talk
    • Fat Eyes – Overdose
    • Prince Jazzbo – Great Dub
    • Kickin' Productions – What You Gonna Do
    • Pliers – I'm Your Man Dub
    • Wiz Kidz Team – In My Heart Version
    • Jammys Jam2 James – Peenie Peenie
    • Deluxe 2×CD£12.00
      In stockAdd to Bag
    • 2×LP Vol.1£18.99
      Out of stock
    • 2×LP Vol.2£18.99
      Out of stock
    • MP3 Release£8.99
      In stockAdd to Bag
    Joseph Hill / Tommy McCook and The SkatalitesBehold The Land / Full DreadSoul Jazz Records

    RARE CUTS! Very Limited edition bespoke Studio One Collector's 45

    ONLY AVAILABLE DIRECT FROM SOUL JAZZ RECORDS & SOUNDS OF THE UNIVERSE

    • Joseph Hill – Behold The Land
    • Tommy McCook and The Skatalites – Full Dread
    Freddie McGregor / Dub SpecialistBobby Bobylon / Hi Fashion DubSoul Jazz Records

    Stone-cold classic Studio One on limited-edition brand new 7" - loud, clean, boom!

    Classic party tune + wicked dub

    • Freddie McGregor – Bobby Bobylon
    • Dub Specialist – Hi Fashion Dub
    Sugar MinottSugar Minott At Studio OneSoul Jazz Records

    Long-out-of-print re-release of this classic Sugar Minott album on Soul Jazz Records bringing together the best of his classic material recorded at Studio One in the 1970s.

    Lincoln Sugar Minott was born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1956. He grew up in a poor area of West Kingston and from an early age developed a love of Reggae music and the music of Studio One in particular. As a teenager, he became selector for Sound of Silence Keystone and Gathering of Youth local sound-systems. By the late 1970s Minott had risen to become one of the biggest stars in Jamaican music.

    Sugar Minott began his career at Studio One. After auditioning in front of Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd in the early 1970s, he became the first artist to record new songs over classic rhythms, singing over original Studio One tapes – the significance of which led directly to the birth of dancehall, as Channel One, Joe Gibbs and hundreds of other Jamaican producers quickly began releasing their own material based on these same classic Studio One rhythms replayed by Sly and Robbie, The Aggrovators, Soul Syndicate, Roots Radics and many others.

    “I knew Studio One spiritually before I knew Studio One physically. You know I grew up beside a dancehall and Sir Coxsone’s sound used to play there from when I was a boy. So from that influence you know I used to love Studio One sound so much, I became a sound selector. So that was my first involvement with getting to know Studio One music like The Heptones, Alton Ellis, Ken Booth, the whole works and that was my life from a youth.”

    After Sugar Minott’s debut many other artists followed suit at the label such as Freddie McGregor, Johnny Osbourne, Lone Ranger and Michigan & Smiley leading to one of the most creative periods for the label. This is the first retrospective of Sugar Minott at the label and most of these recordings have never been widely available outside Jamaica.

    • Sugar Minott – Vanity
    • Sugar Minott – Please Be True
    • Sugar Minott – Hang On Natty
    • Sugar Minott – Never Give Up
    • Sugar Minott – Jahovia
    • Sugar Minott – Give A Hand
    • Sugar Minott – Try Love
    • Sugar Minott – Roof Over My Head
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Jah Lead Us
    • Sugar Minott – Is It True
    • Sugar Minott – Love Gonna Pack Up
    • Sugar Minott – Give Me Jah Jah
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Jah Children
    • Sugar Minott – Party Time
    • Sugar Minott – Change Your Ways
    • Sugar Minott – Jah Almighty
    Jackie MittooOboe / Wall StreetSoul Jazz Records

    BACK IN STOCK!!

    MONSTER STUDIO ONE TUNE FIRST TIME EVER ON A SINGLE !

    Two highly sought after tracks from Jackie Mitoo's legendary 'Showcase' album, originally released on Studio One in 1980

    Hypnotic, blissed out funky reggae from Jamaica's finest - Bagga Walker on bass, Leroy 'Horsemouth' Wallace on drums, Ernest Ranglin on guitar and, of course, the inimitable Jackie Mittoo on keyvoards

    Cut super loud on a 12" single, its literally impossible to find a copy of this album, and if you did it would set you back hundreds of £'s

    Housed in a heavyweight card Studio One sleeve these won't be around for long ! Very Limited edition 1000 copies worldwide 12” pressing

    • Jackie Mittoo – Oboe
    • Jackie Mittoo – Wall Street
    Jackie MittooThe Keyboard King At Studio OneUniversal Sound

    As Soul Jazz Records enter into the mighty vaults of Studio One, the most respected label in reggae history, we present you with this showcase of Jackie Mittoo, one of the defining figureheads of reggae music !

    From forming The Skatalites, at age 15, alongside Don Drummond, Roland Alphonso, Tommy McCook and others, to his work as writer, arranger, producer at Studio One records during the sixties, writing and playing for artists such as Alton Ellis, Ken Boothe, Marcia Griffiths and The Heptones (to name a few), to his career as a solo artist as well as leader of bands such as The Soul Brothers, Soul Vendors and The Sound Dimension, Jackie Mittoo is at the heart of reggae music. He was one of the instigators of Ska, Rocksteady and Reggae. In the seventies, DJ music and Dancehall were based upon classic rhythms of the sixties, many using the instrumental tracks that Jackie Mittoo created at Studio One at this time.

    This compilation features the work of Jackie Mittoo at Studio One. It features music recorded as a solo artist (as opposed to the numerous singers that he accompanied). Most of these are taken from his recordings in the mid sixties where he was recording on an almost daily basis at Studio One's Brentford Road studios developing the funky reggae sound that was his trademark.

    Soul Jazz Records are releasing this CD as the first of a series of Reggae artists to be covered following the success of the 100% Dynamite releases. Jackie Mittoo is as much an icon of Reggae as he is to fans of Funk music. He is without doubt the funkiest keyboard player ever to come out of Jamaica !

    Reviews:

    "CD of the Week. The coolest man who ever lived" THE GUARDIAN***** "

    Named by MOJO as one of the 100 cult heroes of all time, this is a lovingly curated compilation" THE INDEPENDENT

    "After Soul Jazz Records' groundbreaking 100% Dynamite CD's comes Jackie Mittoo. If you've caught the funky reggae bug, you need this" MUZIK

    "Rocksteady, compulsively funky Ska and Soul. An excellent Soul Jazz compilation" MOJO

    • Jackie Mittoo – Get Up And Get It
    • Jackie Mittoo – Black Organ
    • Jackie Mittoo – Killer Diller
    • Jackie Mittoo – Totally Together
    • Jackie Mittoo – Hot Tamale
    • Jackie Mittoo – Reggae Rock
    • Jackie Mittoo – Oboe
    • Jackie Mittoo – Juice Box
    • Jackie Mittoo – Summer Breeze
    • Jackie Mittoo – Drum Song
    • Jackie Mittoo – P. Cafe
    • Jackie Mittoo – Henry The Great
    • Jackie Mittoo – Stereo Freeze
    • Jackie Mittoo – Wall Street
    • Jackie Mittoo – Darker Shade Of Black