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    Boombox Early Independent Hip Hop, Electro and Disco Rap 79 - 82PosterSoul Jazz Records

    Oh yes! 50 x 70cm KILLER poster!!

    Choose "Poster Freepost" if you want this poster sent with any other vinyl order item (LP/12" vinyl only) at NO extra postage charge (poster will be folded into six parts)

    Choose "Poster+Tube" if you want the poster rolled up and sent in a customised, protective tube (more expensive to cover postage)

    THIS ALSO means if you want more than one poster then you should only put 'Poster+Tube' for one of the posters and select 'Poster freepost' for any others as the rest will be free shipping.

      ManujothiShake Your BodySoul Jazz Records

      SORRY SOLD OUT!

      NEW LTD. first edition of 300 copies. Only available EXCLUSIVELY to customers at Soul Jazz Records/Sounds of the Universe.

      Unbelievably rare early modern soulful disco boogie rap 45 single - this is a bomb tune! Currently one original for sale on Discogs for £600!

      Johnny Haywood aka Manujothi wrote, performed and produced this truly rare gem on his own Manujothi Records in South Carolina, USA in 1980 and Soul Jazz Records' are issuing it as a taster for their forthcoming Boombox 2.

      THIS 7-inch can ONLY be bought directly here from Soul Jazz Records or Sounds of the Universe websites and shop.  It is a very limited first edition 300-copies pressing, comes with a free funky Manujothi postcard and you need to buy this 7" now!


      See all the EXCLUSIVE 45s titles only available here!


      • Manujothi – Shake Your Body
      • Manujothi – Shake Your Body (Instrumental)
      • 7"£9.99
        Out of stock
      BoomboxSoul Jazz Records

      Soul Jazz Records’ new Boombox features some of the many innovative underground first-wave of rap records made in New York in the period 1979-82, all released on small, independent, often family-concern record companies, at a time when hip-hop music still remained under the radar.


      This first exuberant wave of innocent, upbeat, party on the block rap records were the first to try and create the sounds heard in community centres, block parties and street jams that first took place in the Bronx in the mid-1970s. But where Flash, Kool Herc and Bambaataa were back-spinning, mixing and scratching together now classic breakbeat records like The Incredible Bongo Band’s Apache or Babe Ruth’s The Mexican, these first rap records were all made using live bands, often replaying then current disco tunes, whilst MCs rapped over the top, creating a unique sound that later became known derisively as old school.


      And while hip-hop started in the Bronx, rap on vinyl began in Harlem where long-time established rhythm and blues producer-owned record companies such as Joe Robinson’s Enjoy Records, Paul Winley’s Winley Records, Delmar Donnel’s Delmar International and Jack Fatman Taylor’s Rojac and Tayster were the first off the mark to realise the commercial potential of rap music - releasing early ground-breaking records that all quickly followed in the wake of the first rap record, The Sugarhill Gang’s Rappers Delight, a million-selling worldwide hit.


      This collection celebrates these first old-school rap records, bringing together rare, classic and obscure tracks released in the early days of rap.


      Deluxe double CD-pack comes with slipcase, 40-page outsize perfect-bound booklet, extensive notes, exclusive photography and original label artwork. Triple-vinyl heavyweight vinyl includes full artwork, text and notes as well as free download code.


      REVIEWS:

      Soul Jazz has a reputation for top-notch compilations that offer crash courses in a variety of styles and genres both beloved and obscure; they are, in essence, the K-Tel of the millennial generation.

      This is one of the best Soul Jazz sets in ages, a legitimate party in a box, overflowing with underground deep cuts that have seldom — if ever — been spotted on other collections - FACT

       ROLLING STONE Best Rap Albums of 2016

      • Mr Sweety G – At The Place To Be
      • Love Bug Star-Ski and The Harlem World Crew – Positive Life
      • Neil B – Body Rock
      • Super 3 – Philosophy Rappin' Spree
      • Bramsam – Move Your Body
      • Black Bird & Kevski – On The Go
      • Count Coolout – Rhythm Rap Rock (CD only)
      • Harlem World Crew – Rappers Convention
      • Willie Wood & The Willie Wood Crew – Willie Rap
      • Bon-Rock & The Rhythm Rebellion – Searching Rap
      • Sugar Daddy – One More Time
      • Spoonie Gee and The Treacherous Three – The New Rap Language
      • TJ Swan – And You Know That
      • Portable Patrol – Cop Bop
      • Master Jay – We Are People Too
      • Sweet G – Boogie Feelin' Rap
      • Mistafide – Equidity Funk
      100% Dynamite! NYCDancehall Reggae Meets Rap In New York CitySoul Jazz Records

      An essential guide to the Dancehall Reggae/Hip-Hop clash that ruled New York in the early 1990s as Shinehead, Supercat, Mad Lion, Bobby Konders and many more rewrote the rules of Dancehall, Reggae and Rap. Killer heavyweight tracks, non-stop. Essential!

      From Kool Herc onwards, Jamaicans who grew up in New York City have played pivotal roles in the development of the city’s musical identity. Hip-Hop, born in the Bronx, was always hot-wired to Jamaica and in the 1990s the two became inextricably joined when reggae met rap in New York City. Dynamite NYC brings together the many artists who created this unique scene, linking together two of the world’s most important musical cultures – hip-hop and reggae.?In the early 1990s, Jamaican dancehall - including artists from this home-grown New York scene - became the subject of close scrutiny by the US major record industry who, having made vast profits from hip-hop, searched out Jamaican or Jamaican-descended artists who could potentially crossover into the vast US hip-hop market. Jamaican dancehall artists were signed to big US contracts (Yellowman, Supercat, Capleton, Shabba Ranks). And New York, previously a satellite town of Kingston for visiting Jamaican artists, but now with its own unique dancehall scene became a focal point as artists such as Shinehead, Red Foxx, Jamal-Ski, Mad Lion, and others were quickly signed up to major record companies.??

      100%Dynamite NYC features these and many other New York reggae/hip-hop crossover artists in this first album to feature the music from this scene.


      REVIEWS

      “100%Dynamite NYC is a proper block party selection. What moves this from wicked to essential is its documentation of the cross-pollination between reggae and hip-hop.” FACT

      “ Soul Jazz gives proof that Yankee-Caribbean fusions run deep and they also make it an enjoyable lesson.” The INDEPENDENT

      SUPER-LOUD VINYL IS IN 2 VOLUMES:
      Volume 1 is tracks 1-11. Volume 2 is tracks 12-22.

      • Supercat – Don Dada (Bobby Konders Mix)
      • Yankee B – The Original
      • Shinehead – Know how Fe Chat
      • Fu Schnickens – Ring The Alarm
      • Born Jamericans – Informer
      • Shaggy – Mattress Jockey (Siren Remix)
      • Jah Batta and Skatee – Style and Fashion
      • Rayvon – Girls Fresh
      • Red Fox – Dem A Murderer
      • Nikey Fungus – Zig Zag Stitch
      • Bobby Konders – Mack Daddy
      • Louie Rankin – Typewriter
      • Mad Lion – Double Trouble (Original Mix)
      • Super C – The Rat
      • Lady Apache – Rock and Comeen
      • Jamalski – Texas Rumpus
      • Ken Albert – Gunshot
      • Shinehead – Rough and Rugged
      • Ugly Man – DJ De Yah
      • Rankin' Don – Real McCoy
      • Mad Lion – Love Woman So
      • Terror Fabulous – Woman Say So
      • Deluxe 2×CD£12.00
        Out of stock
      Fly Girls!Soul Jazz Records

      ‘Fly Girls!’ celebrates the 30th anniversary of female rap on record

      This double-CD (and limited edition two volumes of super-loud double-vinyl) narrates the story of female rap from its birth in the tenement block parties in New York City’s outer boroughs through to the dizzying career heights of Queen Latifah, Missy Elliott and other modern day power brokers. ‘Fly Girls!’ also discusses the influence of an earlier generation of black female poets whose ideals (both in their art and how they established career paths) helped lay the foundations for birth of the genre.

      The history of female rap on record begins in 1979 in New York City as the clamour of the city’s artists, record companies and producers strove to make it onto vinyl in the wake of The Sugarhill Gang’s squillion-selling hit, ‘Rappers Delight’ – released that year on the former soul singer Sylvia Robinson’s Sugarhill Records. It would be the Winley family - comprising sisters Tanya, Paulette - who made the first female rap record produced by their mother Ann and released on their father’s label, Paul Winley Records.

      Aside from the singing/rap styles that earlier soul artists such as Aretha Franklin, Shirley Ellis, Millie Jackson and Laura Lee would occasionally adopt in their songs, female rap (like rap itself) had its antecedents in the groundbreaking black poetry of the 60s and 70s with radical, free-thinking poets such as Nikki Giovanni, Camille Yarborough and Sarah Webster Fabio - all of whom are included here – vocalising hitherto unheard expressions of female and black self-determination in their work. These strong, educated, political women not only led the way stylistically but also helped define how a female artist could make their own career path - weaving creativity, politics and family in a way that Missy Elliott, Queen Latifah and others have since followed - establishing the boundary-breaking career paths of many female artists in rap. Hip-hop is a culture of which music is only a part; nowadays (and to an extent from the very beginning) the most successful female hip-hop artist is often singer, DJ, actress, manager, political and social agitator and more in multiple combinations.

      Hip-hop’s story begins in the tenement blocks and community centres of the South Bronx. In the first three years-or-so history of hip-hop (1976-9) - before the first rap records were made - aspiring female artists could watch onstage the early female MC role models of Sha-Rock (the first female MC in the group The Funky Four plus One) or the Mercedes Ladies (the first female MC and DJ crew). With Tanya and Paulette Winley’s ‘Rappin and Rhymin’ on vinyl by 1979 it would not be until the following year that the first all-female crew made it onto vinyl when Sequence (featuring a then unknown Angie Stone) was astutely signed, once again, by Sylvia Robinson to Sugarhill Records.

      Robinson was not the only woman on the business side of hip-hop. There was Kool Lady Blue who first brought rap out of the Bronx and into downtown NYC at the Roxy nightclub and also later managed The Rocksteady Crew. Monica Lynch who rose to head of A and R and president of Tommy Boy Records, and later vice-president of Warners, comments that because hip-hop was new it did not have the hierarchy of the traditional music industry and women were thus able to move more easily into executive roles. Later, as we shall see, many of the artists moved into the business themselves taking control of their careers and aiding others.

      Roxanne Shante is certainly the first female rapper to make a career out of her music. Shante and fellow Queens-resident and producer Marley Marl fought their corner for both their borough (taking on Boogie Down Productions and the Bronx) and anyone else who dared call themselves ‘Roxanne’ in a slanging-match known as ‘The Roxanne Wars’. This verbal jousting had its antecedents dating back to the ‘dozens’ of the playground and tower-block (‘Your mother is a …’, ‘No, your mother is a …’) and to the Griot storytellers of Africa. Roxanne Shante, and many others here, effortlessly subverted this - and many other - male-dominated traditions to create and re-write new histories.


      Female rap is thirty years old (yes, thirty) and it just don’t stop. Here is a snapshot of that history. The album includes so many firsts – first solo record, first crew on record, first number one, first grammy winner, that it would be easier to list the few records featured here that are not historical landmarks in the ongoing tale of female hip-hop.

      REVIEWS:
      "An incredibly entertaining selection of trailblazers that consistently hits the right note" OBSERVER

      "Soul Jazz provide the ultimate sourcebook" TIME OUT

      "It's not easy to imagine a more enjoyable survey of female MCs" THE GUARDIAN

      "An excellent album that is quite simply tons of fun" THE WIRE

      "This is the sort of thing Soul Jazz does best: a history of an under-anthologised corner of the musical world. 'Fly Girls!' collects many of the major names from the first wave of female rappers. INDEPENDENT

      French Reviews:

      LES INROCKS

      TELERAMA

      The Vinyl is in two double-album editions:

      VOLUME 1 - Tracks 1-10

      VOLUME 2 - Tracks 11-20

      • JJ Fad – Ya Goin' Down
      • Princess MC – Pump Up The Funk
      • Tanya Winley – Vicious Rap
      • Sweet Tee – I Got Da Feelin'
      • Nikki Giovanni – Ego Tripping
      • MC Lyte – Cha Cha Cha
      • Two Sisters – B-Boys Beware
      • Cookie Crew – Secrets of Success
      • Sequence – Simon Says
      • Bahamadia – Paper Thin
      • Sparky D – I Can't Stop
      • Queen Latifah Featuring Monie Love – Ladies First
      • Lady B – To The Beat Y'All
      • Camille Yarbrough – Take Yo' Praise
      • Missy Elliot – The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly)
      • Dimples D – Sucker DJ
      • She Rockers – Give It A Rest
      • Sarah Webster Fabio – Glimpses
      • The Kryptic Krew featuring Tina B – Jazzy Sensation
      • Roxanne Shanté – Bite This